The Irresistible Fleet of Bicycles

Greenhorns presents: Wild fruit vinega! Making Apple cider vinegar on a homestead scale.

Join us for a half day session at our new HQ at Reversing Hall in Pembroke Maine where we will be learning how to make apple cider vinegar on a homestead scale!

Over the course of the workshop we will be covering all of the essentials of vinegar making. This will include:

  • Learning how to make ACV for your own use. We’ll be Gathering wild and heirloom apples which we will then turn into vinegar.
  • We will be tasting various varieties of apples and learning how the different flavor profiles in the fruit impact the flavor outcome in the cider. We will use this info to generate a ‘data sheet’ on the prolific wild and cultivated trees in the area.
  • Learning the best means for pressing apples, as well as the essentials of sanitation practices and other relevant rules.
  • We will learn the basics of fermentation.
  • Both materials and space will be provided and you will end up with your own carboy of vinegar. We will go through the production methods for producing fire cider, vinaigrette, herbal vinegar and other value added products.
  • Other considerations such as labels, sales rules, MOFGA regulations etc will also be covered.
Important Info:

Date: October 13th

Cost: sliding scale $50- $100 (includes the glass carboy), scholarships available.

Location: Reversing Hall, Pembroke ME 04666

RSVP required, email office@greenhorns.org 


Maine Outdoor Film Festival Screening in Belfast

Join us at the Maine Outdoor Film Festival for an evening of films, shown outdoors at Waterfall Arts, Belfast. This evening’s selection will feature conservation and outdoor adventure shorts. This year they have opted to include episode 6 of Greenhorn’s OurLand – The Crown of Maine

The total running time of the film festival is 84 minutes. There will also be a brief intermission with a free door prize raffle.

Details

Date: Saturday, September 8, 2018
Time: 30 minutes after sunset (about 8:00PM)
Cost: $10 suggested donation
Location: Waterfall Arts – 256 High St, Belfast, Maine 04915

Presented in partnership with: Waterfall Arts

FILMS TO BE SCREENED (in no particular order):

Film Name  – Director – Running Time
Yojani | A Cuba Skate Story – Makewild – 2:00
Wild Ice – Backcountry Skating Alaska – Cale Green Sockeye Red Services & Paxson Woelber – 3:00
Bailey and the Alewives – Molly Haley Molly Haley Photography & David Meiklejohn – 5:19
Playing on the Pinn – Rob Johnson – 10:50
Our Land: The Crown of Maine – The Greenhorns – 11:51
This Place Called Nuka: Courting Adventure in Wild Alaska – Dave Weich – 22:20
Bears Ears – Hank Leukart Without Baggage – 28:45

*Screening schedule is subject to change*


Maine Outdoor Film Festival in Fort Kent

Join us at the Maine Outdoor Film Festival for an evening of outdoor films under the stars at Riverside Park Pavillion. The total running time for the film festival is 61 minutes and there will also be a brief intermission with a free door prize raffle.

Details:

Date: Thursday, September 13th, 2018
Time: Doors: 6:45 PM. Films 7:45PM
Admission: Free
Location: Riverside Park Pavillion

Presented in partnership with: BikeMaine

FILMS TO BE SCREENED (in no particular order):

Film Name – Director- Running Time
Jimmy Smith – Chris Olson, Austin Elliott – 2:30
Nick Livesey – My Mountain Healing – Rob Johnson – 5:31
One Week At A Time – No Umbrella Media – 11:17
Our Land: The Crown of MaineThe Greenhorns – 11:51
Guanaco – Pedro McCardell – 15:00
Ride the Rhine – Joe Enoch – 9:57

*Screening schedule is subject to change*


Greenhorns Presents: Forest Mycology and Wild Edibles in the Maine Woodlands And Wildlands

September 7th-9th Greenhorns and Eat Local Eastport present: Forest Mycology and Wild Edibles in the Maine Woodlands And Wildlands with Russ Cohen and Peter McCoy.

Join Russ Cohen and Peter McCoy for a weekend in the Maine wildlands and woodlands. Russ and Peter will teach us how to interact with and feed ourselves from the wild world around us – sustainably.

On Friday evening, we will all come together to learn the theoretical aspects of foraging for wild plants and mushrooms, this includes processes for identifying wild plants in the region as well as instructions for sustainable harvesting of wild edibles. Maine is home to over 100 species of edible wild plants. Many of these species are more nutritious and/or flavorful than their cultivated counterparts. These include native species like Black Raspberry and Shagbark Hickory, non-native weeds like Burdock and Chicory, and exotic invasive species like Dame’s Rocket and Japanese Knotweed. The Pine Tree State is also home to dozens of species of edible mushrooms. Russ’ evening talk will cover at least four dozen of the tastiest species the region has to offer. These include species everyone knows well, like Daisies and Dandelions, plus species they may never have even heard of, like Calamus and Carrion Flower.  At least a dozen of the easier-to-recognize edible mushrooms will be covered too, from Morels in the spring, to Black Trumpets in the summer, to Hen-of-the-Woods mushrooms in the fall. Keys to the identification of each species will be provided, along with info on edible portion(s), season(s) of availability and preparation methods, as well as guidelines for safe and environmentally responsible foraging. Russ will also include a few details regarding some native edible plants he has grown successfully from seed, and the partnerships he has made with conservation groups and others to add edible native plants to their landscapes. Last but not least, Russ will accompany his talk with handouts and several foraged goodies made with wild ingredients. There will be ample time for questions and discussions.

On Saturday Peter will begin with a talk and presentation focused on mushrooms. He will cover Fungal biology, ecology, and cultural history of mushrooms, Mushroom and lichen identification and wild harvesting ethics, tactics for measuring forest health with lichens and mushrooms, and habitat regeneration with fungi. Later in the day Russ will lead a guided wild plant and edible walk. We will spend the afternoon exploring the Downeast landscapes in search of edible wild plants and putting the theory that we learn on Friday and Saturday morning into action. While it’s never possible to predict exactly what types of wild edibles that we might encounter,  given the time of year, Russ expects to encounter and share the delicious details about at least two dozen species. These could include edible farm weeds like Lamb’s Quarters and Purslane, edible roadside weeds like Curly Dock and Wild Parsnip, edible coastal plants, like Beach Rose and Beach Pea, and edible native plants preferring damp, sunny habitats, like Cattail, Elderberry and Groundnut. Mushrooms are even more elusive than their wild plant counterparts, however following on from his presentation in the morning Peter will teach us how to identify and harvest and mushrooms and lichens that we encounter and will explain the role that these fungus play in their environment.

On Sunday Peter will focus on the thousand-year old Japanese tradition of Shiitake log cultivation. He will cover best practices for site selection, inoculation, and harvesting in depth. You’ll learn hands-on how to create a productive, and low input mini-mushroom farm to produce pounds of Shiitake mushrooms on demand! He will also guide us through the processes involved in processing mushrooms and lichens for natural medicines and dyes.

Both Peter and Russ are passionate about sustainability and environmental responsibility so in addition to tips on identification of wild species there will also be a focus on safe and environmentally responsible foraging throughout the weekend. This workshop is not suitable for, or intended to be a guide or training course for those looking to harvest wild plants for commercial sale.

Every Participant will receive a signed copy of Russ Cohen’s best selling book Wild Plants I Have Known….And Eaten.

Important info: 
Date: 7th-9th September
Location: Reversing Hall and Smithereen Farm, Pembroke ME 04666 (Camping spaces available)
Cost:
$40 for weekend (downeasters)
$150 for weekend  (from away, includes meals and camping)

 

3 day programme – limited spaces, RSVP required, email office@greenhorns.org.

Greenhorns Presents: BUZZ BUZZ Natural Beekeeping with Tucka B

Interested in natural beekeeping? It seems like summer, but winter is coming! Learn to prepare your bees for the long dark days by starting early.

This course will cover natural beekeeping basics, observation practices and bee walks as well as lecture in the hall. Using live hives and working directly with the bees, Tucka will teach us how to complete a live late-summer inspection and will give relevant advice and tips on feeding, treating and other fall activities. Please bring your protective gear as well as an inquiring mind. Stings do happen!

About our Teacher, Tucka.
It all started with the Natural Beekeeping Trust in England, where a swarm flew away with her heart. Since then, she’s worked with a series of mentors, most notably the bees themselves. Tucka currently raises queens in box hives in upstate NY, and works for Mike Palmer – legendary beekeeper in upstate VT. Her operation is strongly influenced by the survivor stock and radical ideas of Sam Comfort from anarchy apiaries.

@tuckabee
@comforthive

Email office@greenhorns.org asap to register.


Pembroke Farm & Horse Fair

The Pembroke Farm and Horse Fair takes place on August 26th & 27th this year. First started in 1841 funds raised this year will be used to restore the historic track and upgrade the grounds. Greenhorns will be there pressing apples all weekend. Tucka B will be doing a bee demo at the fair on the morning of the 26th before her Natural Beekeeping workshop on Smithereen Farm.

Come and join us and bring your apples to have them pressed! There will also be judging of Vegetables, Jams & Jellies, Crafts for Sale, Music, Quilts, Food, Trotter & Pacer Demonstrations, Games for Children and much much more.

Admission is $3 – kids under 12 go free. Check out the full schedule HERE


temple-wilton community farm in new hampshire are seeking an apprentice!

posted August 22, 2018

temple-wilton
credit: temple-wilton community farm

Temple-Wilton Community Farm is seeking a vegetable and/or cheese apprentice for the months of September and October, 2018. There is space for two candidates but it is possible the right person could split time between both operations if so interested. Besides the many hours dedicated to training, you will be provided with a bedroom in a beautiful apartment with other farm workers, access to all foods produced by the farm, WiFi, and a stipend of $500/ month.

About the Temple-Wilton Community farm:
The Temple-Wilton Community Farm was formed during the winter of 1985/1986 and is the oldest continuously operating CSA in the United States. They produce a full range of vegetables for our CSA members, including many storage vegetables that take them through the winter and into the following spring. They also provide milk, yogurt, cheese, eggs and meat for our members and sell surplus to the public. In addition they buy in a number of other items which are also for sale to the public in our farm store. In 2016 they became a Member Owned Cooperative. See twcfarm.com for more information.
Here is what they have to say about the apprenticeships on offer:
Vegetable Apprenticeship
As the planting phase of our season has come to a close, work with vegetables will center around cultivating and harvesting a diversity of crops with special emphasis on harvesting our storage crops to last us through the winter– carrots, parsnips, beets, potatoes, endive, celeriac, turnips, radishes, rutabaga, etc. Other tasks will include regular setup of our farm store, clearing and laying the fields to rest in cover crops, making compost with crop residues, making and spraying biodynamic preparations, and planting garlic to be overwintered.
The rhythm of the work is determined entirely by the needs of the many different crops that we grow, so our schedules must be very flexible. In general, the work day will be from 7am to 12:30pm and 2pm until 5-6pm depending on what tasks need to be completed. Sundays are generally off but there are some exceptions, especially during the big harvest season when we all need to be fully available to meet the needs of the farm.
As a member of the vegetable crew you would be working with head gardener Jacob Holubeck and two other apprentices. Depending on how the season unfolds there may be opportunities to continue on as well. If you enjoy fall in New England and productive work outdoors, this may be the opportunity you have been waiting for!
If you are interested in applying for the work in the vegetable fields please contact Jacob Holubeck at jaholubeck@gmail.com, or call him at 603-831-1213.
.
Cheese Apprenticeship
Abbot Hill Creamery offers a practical training in cheese making. What you learn will depend mostly on what you wish to learn and are capable of. There is also space to do your own projects, such as making or developing a new cheese.
Necessary Qualities of a Cheese Apprentice:
  • Loves cheese!
  • Sincere interest in learning how to make and sell cheese
  • Hard working
  • Pays meticulous attention to detail and order
  • Gives attention to cleanliness and takes joy in cleaning (70% of cheese making is washing things)
  • Always tries to give their best
  • Ability to work alone and take on responsibilities
Computer skills are welcome as well as a willingness to do some chores on the farm. A love for animals is much appreciated.
What you will learn:
  • How to make many different kinds of cheese including (but not limited to) Gouda, Alpine Style, Quark, Blue Cheese, Camembert, Parmesan, Mozzarella, and Feta
  • How to make yoghurt
  • Cave Management (washing, brining, flipping, and overall age management of cheese)
  • Selling cheese
If you are interested in making cheese with their small and diverse creamery, please contact their friendly cheese maker Benjamin at bjonas.meier@gmail.com

August 17th-25th Greenhorns Presents: Sail Training Camp: Downeast Foxfire with Arista Holden

Greenhorns is pleased to present our first sail training program, a follow up on Maine Sail Freight project, which brought us to Maine! Starting at Liberty Hall in Machiasport and visiting islands, coves, and historic sites while immersing students in the wild coastal ecology of Downeast Maine, this ten day course offers a birch bark crafting workshop, traditional seamanship training and all sorts of naturalist adventure. Yes, you will learn to row and sail aboard the 18th-century Bantry Bay gigs.

Starts in the afternoon on Friday the 17th, ends the morning of the 25th. Starts and Ends in Machiasport, Maine

44 ̊37’15” N 67 ̊23’03” W

$450 Includes:
Three meals a day with snacks.

Training in:
-Traditional seamanship: rowing, sailing, navigation, knots, tide and weather
-Spoon carving and birch bark containers
-Sustainable firewood lot management
-Island farming
-Leave No Trace camp craft techniques

*Does not Include:
-Getting to/from Machiasport. We will help you connect with other participants to carpool. The nearest International airport and bus station with connections to major US cities is in Bangor.

Group size: 15 people​
Sign up by June 1st.

*Our insurance requires the minimum age to be at least 16 at start of program.
*Scholarships avaliable

Here is sign up spot: https://www.atlanticchallengeusa.com/downeast-foxfire-camp.html


the agrihood

posted August 7, 2018

agrihoods
Image Credit: REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Have you heard about agrihoods? The concept has been gaining popularity over the last few years and the term is short for “agricultural neighbourhoods”. Agricultural neighbourhoods is an unusual concept. Agricultural tends to conjure images of rural living, open spaces and sprawling farmland. Neighbourhoods on the other hand bring to mind images of suburbia or urban spaces – densely populated concrete jungles. The idea of an agrihood fuses these two very different concepts into something new and they are being heralded as a creation of millennials.

Reading the recent piece in the World Economic Forum on agrihoods, I couldn’t help but think back to the stories I have heard about wartime London, where public spaces were transformed into allotments to help people grow food for themselves. While this was primarily a government response to wartime food shortages that ceased shortly after the war, it makes for an interesting comparison nonetheless. Humans have been intentionally cultivating and growing food for 12,000, agriculture is the foundation of human civilisation and is something inherent in human nature. In time of hardship we turn away from importing food and grow it for ourselves instead.

Agrihoods, as far as I can tell do not spring from a lack of food or resources, but instead seem to be a creation of young, wealthy people with ample resources. “Agrihoods are designed to appeal to young, active families who love to eat healthy and spend time outdoors — and they’re not off the grid.” They are intentional communities designed to be working and sustainable living spaces. They represent a “confluence of economic profits, environmental good, and social benefit” that appeals to the millennial mindset.

The WE Forum article also makes an interesting comparison between the agrihood of today and the golf course preferred by our predecessors. In fact, in Palm Springs CA, developers are ripping out an 18 hole golf course in order to turn it into a olive grove which will serve as the epicentre for an agrihood called Miarlon.

I am excited about the potential of agrihoods. The more sustainable agriculture that we are practicing close to home the better for a multitude of reasons (not least that no food tastes as good as the food that you have grown and picked yourself). However in reading about these shiny new developments, I cannot help but be concerned that agrihoods may very well become the golf courses of tomorrow. With prices between $300,000 and $700,000 for a house in the Miralon community, only the already wealthy millennials will be able to benefit from this new trend. “Wealthy” is not a term typically used to describe millennials, so I have to wonder, who are these agrihoods being built for? What do you think? Let us know in the comments!

Click HERE to read the full article on the World Economic Forum


August 5th Greenhorns & Jim Cornish Present: Blueberry Wine Workshop

Join us on August 5th from noon until 4:00 pm for our Blueberry Wine making workshop with Jim Cornish. Participants are required to bring 15 pounds of blueberries (you can pick your own blueberries in our blueberry commons the morning of the workshop) and a potato masher the day of the workshop in addition to 12 pounds of sugar five teaspoons of lemon juice and five teaspoons of yeast to add on the third day after the workshop. The wine yield will be approx. 5 1/2 gallons. After the workshop spend an evening with Jim listening to and singing along to live Folk and Americana music that we all know and love sprinkled with a few original songs.

This workshop costs $50, which includes step by step instructions, a fermenting bucket, an air lock and a corker. Email office@greenhorns.org now to register