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biodiversity

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seed: the untold story - a documentary following the history and perilous future of food crop biodiversity

Over the last century, "94% of our seed diversity has disappeared". In this documentary, follow passionate seedkeepers and activists to unbury the history and future of seeds. From the directors, Jon Betz and Taggart Siegel: "The story of our seeds is a defining story of our time. Caught between the runaway juggernaut of industrial agriculture […]

Posted: October 2 2020
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growing rice in maine!

Check out this awesome rice growing project in Maine by Wild Folk Farm. Their goal is to get as many farmers and folks eating and growing rice throughout Maine, the Maritimes, and the Northeast. They are developing an educational, research and commercialized rice operation as currently there are no commercial rice growers in the state, and […]

Posted: November 8 2017
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insect numbers fall by 76% in 27 years signaling an impending 'ecological armageddon'

The Guardian are warning of an ecological armageddon due to the data published in a study released yesterday which shows that insect populations have declined by over 75% in the last quarter century. “Insects make up about two-thirds of all life on Earth [but] there has been some kind of horrific decline,” said Prof Dave Goulson […]

Posted: October 19 2017
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largest field study of its kind shows that pesticide use is killing bees.

We posted last week about a study carried out on bee populations in NNY and the effects that pathogens and parasites are having on bee populations in the region, however it seems as though bee health is the flavour of the month as another, much larger study has just been released which studied the effects […]

Posted: July 3 2017
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a mushroom with a story

A journey through the underworld of life and capitalism to find inspiration in precarious places.

Posted: April 7 2017
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a legal step forward in the fight against herbicides

Monsanto's Roundup is facing increasing legal pressure with it's active ingredient being labeled as potential carcinogen.  From the St. Louis Post-Dispatch: Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s marquee product, Roundup, is coming under fire from hundreds of legal challenges across the U.S., with individuals alleging that the herbicide is carcinogenic and linked to cases of […]

Posted: March 31 2017
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seedy films

A step-by-step video series on seed saving for 32 vegetable crops.

Posted: March 24 2017
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praise be the tree

Have you taken any time today to think about how great trees are? Andy Lipkis of Tree People in Los Angeles is on Kiss the Ground to right that wrong.

Posted: February 16 2017
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how the wolves saved yellowstone: a lesson in keystone species

A lesson in keystone species and biodiversity. When wolves are reintroduced to Yellowstone, incredible changes occur.

Posted: January 5 2017
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buy nothing catalogue

photo: Samuel Oslund It's that time of year. The gifts are torn apart,the wrapping paper lays warm next to the dying tree, boots are on, and people are piling into cars, lining up at shops, trampling and fighting for deals, deals, deals! We're doing a little internal shopping. Check out the buy nothing catalogue, a […]

Posted: December 26 2016
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plant more trees, if only for the glowing geckos!

Hey, we mostly all know by now that trees are pretty nifty things. But, did you know that some scientists are using the migration patterns of glowing geckos to prove just how important trees are in the protection of both flora and fauna on your farm? What better way to show that climate change is […]

Posted: December 7 2016
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A New Almanac for the Young Farmers of the World

Coverage of The New Farmer's Almanac on Takepart: The Greenhorns, a nonprofit dedicated to young agrarians, is updating one of America’s oldest ag publications. (Photo: Getty Images) Long before Martha Stewart printed her seasonal gardening chores on the first pages in each issue of Martha Stewart Living, The Old Farmer’s Almanac outlined the farm-related tasks […]

Posted: November 21 2016
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Haiku Aina Permaculture Initiative

Respected Internet explorers and seekers of Harmony with Nature; welcome to this entry portal, introducing you to our work at the Ha’iku Aina Permaculture Initiative (also known as HAPI). The project, as we see it, is a way of applying principles of agroforestry and permaculture in an area of rainforest on this beautiful island in the South Pacific […]

Posted: November 17 2016
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New financing for small farmers:

Kiva and Greenhorns working together to help small farmers grow their businesses Katrina and Keely, Founders of Tinyfield Farm in Brooklyn, NY The Greenhorns and Kiva are working together to help farmers access the capital and customers they need to successfully grow their businesses. Over the next few months, The Greenhorns will host a series […]

Posted: October 19 2016
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yikes!!!!! the future of agriculture or science fiction?

In a recent ECONOMIST article, the future of agriculture is controlled by computers, genetic manipulation, big data, and the assumption that we humans know what is going on with soil-plant relationships (*sarcasm*). This article reads scarily of science fiction. http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/external/tq2016/images/tq2.jpg "Farms, then, are becoming more like factories: tightly controlled operations for turning out reliable products, […]

Posted: June 16 2016
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norwegian seaweed!

For you seaweed fans out there, check out this online Norwegian seaweed shop!

Posted: June 16 2016
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monarch habitat eqip deadline friday!

There is a deadline this Friday for getting signed up for a special Monarch Habitat EQIP contract that’s very different from the normal.  You don’t have to be a producer, it’s not a rental payment but an incentive for seeding so it’s a one-time payment.  So, anyone with an odd half acre minimum (like where […]

Posted: May 19 2016
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how to conserve biodiversity on the farm

Agriculture comprises almost 60% of the continental U.S., and 40% of the Earth’s landscape. As our population grows and our planet heats up, it is imperative that we take advantage of biodiversity and the benefits it provides. When doing so, the farm will be more resilient to changes in climate that will cause increasing drought […]

Posted: May 19 2016
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prairie roots

White-knuckling a fiddlehead in the yard on a summer afternoon my neck and nose burning I remember that vague hot musk smell of it and the roots cemented into miles of cracked clay, the nerve - One time I was scaling a rock wall and lost my balance My hand grasped a clump of bunch grass and it […]

Posted: May 9 2016
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ugly fruit is especially nutritious

Greenhorns blogger Eliza Greenman is featured on NPR, the Weather Channel and Food&Wine this week in regards to her work on #eatuglyapples! Food&Wine: Bruised and scabbed apples have more antioxidants and sugars because they've fought off natural stressors. Grocery shoppers don't generally make a beeline to the scabbed and blemished apples. But maybe they should. […]

Posted: April 28 2016
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biodiversity conference, harvard, april 30th

Announcing the following conference at Harvard on April 30th: THE POWER AND PROMISE OF BIODIVERSITY: VISIONS OF RESTORING SEA, LAND, AND CLIMATE Geological Lecture Hall 24 Oxford Street Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA The conference promises to "present the concepts, history, and processes for the restoration of biodiversity" in hopes that increasing global biodiversity can sequester carbon […]

Posted: April 26 2016
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we have some qualms about partnership with large seed companies

Nestled in the Norwegian Arctic, secure in an underground vault, rests one resource mankind cannot live without: seeds. The vault is a piece of a larger project of agricultural pioneer Cary Fowler in a passionate race against time to protect the future of our food supply, as captured in a documentary film Seeds of Time. […]

Posted: April 20 2016
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purple straw wheat- an heirloom wheat for whiskey, cake and biscuits

In their ongoing quest to revive and preserve ancestral grains, a Clemson University scientist and his collaborators have begun the process of restoring a nearly extinct variety of wheat that traces its American roots to the 1700s. Purple Straw is the only heirloom wheat to have been cultivated continually in the South from the Colonial […]

Posted: March 24 2016
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$200 cash prize for the largest chestnut tree in new york

The New York Chapter of the American Chestnut Federation (ACF) is offering a $200 reward for the discovery of the largest living Chestnut tree in New York. And $50 for any trees that are over 14" DBH! As Jerry Henkin, librarian for the Northern Nut Grower's Association (NNGA) writes, "There is a tradition for this […]

Posted: January 31 2016
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the world's most important fruit

http://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/D0F8/production/_87469435_f9a4b729-ae1a-4488-8aef-6ba8b944b043.jpg Sitting in picture-perfect Peak District grounds, Chatsworth House seems an unlikely birthplace for today's global banana industry. But practically every banana consumed in the western world is directly descended from a plant grown in the Derbyshire estate's hothouse 180 years ago. This is the story of how the Cavendish became the world's most important […]

Posted: January 30 2016
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heritage grass discovered in wisconsin

A forgotten forage grass imported from Europe in the 1800s could soon begin to help boost cattle and dairy production in parts of the Upper Midwest. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists in Madison, Wisconsin, recently released the grass for commercial production. The grass, named "Hidden Valley," was discovered on a farmer's shaded hilltop in […]

Posted: January 21 2016
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federal action on insecticides harmful to bees

EPA is making moves again on neonicotinoid insecticides with report saying--- in a dramatic understatement typical of the agency that has rarely regulated agricultural chemicals with any rigor ----that the insecticide in question (imidacloprid): "Potentially poses risk to hives when the pesticide comes in contact with certain crops that attract pollinators." You have 60 days to […]

Posted: January 6 2016
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accessing data in genebanks

DivSeek aims to unlock the potential of crop diversity stored in genebanks around the globe and make it available to all so that it can be utilized to enhance the productivity, sustainability and resilience of crops and agricultural systems. This will help to bridge the gap between the information requirements of genebank curators, plant breeders […]

Posted: December 31 2015
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hawaii back story of colonialization

What We Want vs. What We Can Get:Colonizing Ourselves Colonization can take place in many ways. One of the ways that it occurs is diverting our energy away from organizing for what we actually want, to instead organizing for what we think we can get under the current system. Large environmental groups in the U.S. […]

Posted: December 24 2015
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one of colorado's most endangered places

The Gold Medal Orchard, located in Montezuma County, Colorado, started in the 1890s. The name "Gold Medal Orchard" comes from the gold medal its fruits won at the the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis. Many of the varieties of fruits grown in the orchard have long since vanished from the farmers markets--that is until […]

Posted: December 12 2015
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tucson arizona recognized as world city of gastronomy by unesco

http://garynabhan.com/i/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Jeff-Smith_Heritage-Foods-Mission-Garden_Edible-Baja-Arizona_03-1-480x320.jpg Tucson has always been a city of gastronomy. Today, it was designated a World City of Gastronomy by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), becoming the first city in the United States to receive such a designation. The designation adds Tucson to UNESCO’s Creative Cities Network, created in 2004 to promote […]

Posted: December 11 2015
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red clover genome for sustainable farming

November 30, 2015 The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC) in collaboration with IBERS, has sequenced and assembled the DNA of red clover to help breeders improve the beneficial traits of this important forage crop. The genome is published in Scientific Reports, a journal from the Nature publishing group. Before industrial nitrogen fertiliser production (from fossil fuels), […]

Posted: December 1 2015
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sewing the seeds of syria: farming group rescues plant species threatened by war

The Experimental Farm Network seeks to preserve the world’s biodiversity one seed at a time. The best case for a plant’s survival is for people to grow it widely. Taylor is part of the Experimental Farm Network, a New Jersey-based group that connects farmers and gardeners to exchange rare and threatened varieties of plants, including […]

Posted: November 18 2015
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research highlight: removing non-crop habitat does not increase food safety

Schematic of farm environment using co-management approach for food safety and environment. In 2006, a deadly Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreak in bagged spinach was traced to California’s Central Coast region, where >70% of the salad vegetables sold in the United States are produced. Although no definitive cause for the outbreak could be determined, wildlife was […]

Posted: August 19 2015
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northern NY research evaluates non-traditional crops for high tunnel growers

The Northern New York Agricultural Development Program has funded a number of projects evaluating ways to extend the growing season and crop options for high tunnel farmers in Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Jefferson, Lewis and St. Lawrence counties; photo: Michael Davis, Willsboro Agricultural Research Farm. Can cucumbers, basil, ginger, green beans and zucchini be more profitable […]

Posted: August 19 2015