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corn

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flint corn restoration project immersion experience opportunity

A message from Albie and Michele in Norridgewock, ME who are offering a wonderful opportunity in flint corn cultivation, harvest and processing: June 3, 2020Dear Friends, We have been finding and preserving and growing out Maine and Northeast varieties of flint corn now for several years.  We have given away thousands and thousands of seeds […]

Posted: June 4 2020
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amazing footage of corn monsters

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_hvGmoLrE0] You're never seen a sprout look this ghoulish. AMAZING video from band C.A.M.P.O.S. for their song Teosinte, which features incredible slow-mo of the title seed germinating. Most of the sites that reviewed the band mentioned that teosinte is a "form of Mesoamerican corn," but being the horticulture geeks that we are, we can't help […]

Posted: March 14 2017
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global action plan for agricultural diversification

From over half a million plant species on the planet, we currently rely on just four crops (wheat, rice, maize and soybean) for more than three-quarters of our food supply. These `major’ crops are grown in a limited number of exporting countries, usually as monocultures, and are highly dependent on inputs such as fertiliser and […]

Posted: December 30 2015
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monsanto cancels building new industrial plant

The Gazette, and Iowa City newspaper, recently published a story mentioning the "struggling farm economy" being the cause of the cancellation of a $90,000,000 Monsanto seed corn plant. The story can be found here, but one must ask the question: Is consumer awareness prohibiting the expansion of these GMO giants? Keep putting your money where […]

Posted: December 30 2015
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greenhorns report on the national ffa convention

Greenhorns, in partnership with Organic Consumers Association were in attendance last month at the national gathering of the FFA. The FFA National Convention in Louisville, Kentucky, saw a sea of 60,000 students representing every nook and cranny of America (and its territories) gathered together for fellowship, belonging, education and scholarly competition. Between the ages of 13 and 18, many of these students are next-in-line to the family farm and occupy a strategically powerful position in the future of American Agriculture; they are kids with land. With a self-confidence rarely seen in teenagers and impeccable public speaking skills, these students in their blue corduroy jackets cut quite the impressive figure, particularly in a stadium context.
They are team-spirited, motivated and articulate, and most of them credit these qualities to the organization that brought them together, the FFA. The FFA is turning these next-in-line farmers, agriscientists, ag teachers and farm sympathizers into successful leaders, fierce entrepreneurs, and good Samaritans...for Big Ag.
This polished youth constituency at the FFA sing the praises, almost exclusively, of Big Ag. How did this happen? Lets start with the obvious place; let’s follow the money.

Posted: November 24 2014