June 23rd Greenhorns and Maine Seaweed Exchange present: Wild + Cultivated algae: Seaweed Workshop #1

Join Sarah Redmond and a special guest teacher for a full day session about seaweed! This will include:

– Presentations and Slideshows at the Reversing Hall, field study on the shore.

– Orientation to the inter-tidal and the marine biology found there.

– Introduction to wildcrafting and farming edible seaweeds

– Look at the history of seaweed aquaculture around the world.

– Looking at the potential in Maine: opportunities and risks

– Introduction to the work of Elinor Ostrom on the Commons, and principles of community resource management

– Introduction to species, ecology, ethics, equipment, siting considerations, seasonality, harvest, processing.

– We’ll discuss bio-safety protocols, health and disease management strategies.

– We will talk about local economy, political ecology and learning our lessons from fisheries history in Maine.

– We’ll discuss what kind of policy is needed create a strong, sustainable and resilient sector in Maine that is inviting to young, conservation-minded mariculturists

– We’ll evaluate wild and cultivated products, discuss best practices and market potential

– We will have plenty of time for discussion.

Sarah Redmond is an entrepreneur, innovator, and seaweed farmer on the coast of Maine. Holding a Bachelor’s of Science in Aquaculture from the University of Maine, and a Master’s of Science in Marine Botany from the University of Connecticut, her work has inspired a domestic seaweed revival through her work at NOAA’s Maine Sea Grant program as a farmer, researcher, educator, and research specialist from 2012-2016. A recognized leader in the development of seaweed mariculture, she has helped establish farms and nurseries throughout the Northeast, inspiring others to love, grow, use, and appreciate our native seaweeds. She is currently working as a full-time seaweed farmer to develop a seaweed aquaculture industry in Maine that will produce healthy, nutrient dense sea vegetables, provide economic opportunities to coastal communities, and bring seaweeds to America in a clean, sustainable, and accessible way. She has a 24-acre seaweed farm in Downeast Maine where she cultivates dulse and four different types of kelp.

Farm lunch provided $200/Scholarships available office@greenhorns.org to RSVP


listen: Severine talks seaweed on the BBC

posted September 22, 2017

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Photo Credit: Gordon Chibroski/Press Herald Staff Photographer

Severine spoke to BBC radio in the UK this about the need for an informed and sustainable approach to seaweed farming, one of the fastest growing aquaculture sectors anywhere right now. Listen to her talk about the culinary benefits of seaweed, and tell the story about how she got into seaweed herself on the coast of Maine by getting in literal touch with nature.

Listen to the full programme HERE


ocean forager amanda swimmer live on GH radio this tuesday

posted December 2, 2016

Amanda Swimmer wild-harvests local seaweed in her home in British Columbia to sell for food and medicine. She talks to Greenhorns Radio about local foods, added value products, and the value of our ocean commons on the Heritage Radio Network this TUESDAY DEC 6 at 4:00 p.m.



could kelp trump kale?

posted August 18, 2015

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Gabriela Bradt, a fisheries specialist at the University of New Hampshire, is ready to make Kelp the “Kale of the Sea”.

According to her interview in The Salt:

“The American varieties of kelp and other seaweeds, though, are thought to be milder in flavor than ones found in Asian waters. But they contain the same “nutritional smorgasbord” of other sea plants — they’re packed with vitamins and minerals including iodine, calcium, magnesium and vitamin B12.”

Kelp and seaweed are already prominent products in the local scene here in Maine.  With the excitement still building for the Maine Sail Freight, we think you should give it a taste!