CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS! The New Farmer’s Almanac, Vol V, the FARMERS NEW DEAL

posted December 10, 2019

The New Farmer’s Almanac is a place for public thinking and proactive literary inquiry into the future we share on the land and at the table. Shifting practices is a team sport, and with its original artwork, stories, poetry, and old-time manifestos, this is just the compendium to inspire your own part in the mix.

Submissions for Volume V will be accepted between December 1, 2019 and March 1, 2020. If you miss that deadline, query anyway—we may still be seeking just what you have to share! 

Submission Guidelines: 

Query before submitting at almanac@greenhorns.org. Include a brief description of the work you’d like to submit, and a word or two on your connection to the land. You can pitch completed work, work-in-progress, or ideas on work-to-be.

Written Submissions

We will consider essays, interviews, recipes, ruminations, reading lists, rants, star charts, stories, instructions, jokes, thoughts, dreams, or other curious textual things. For prose, 700 words (give or take) is our preferred length. (We’ve been known to be flexible, but it’s not often that we publish works longer than eight pages). If you’re submitting poems, give us up to three to consider. If your work defies such categories, aim for one page, or two, or three (but no more than that unless we ask).

Visual Arts Submissions

We will consider photographs, original art, illustrations, picture essays, flowcharts, diagrams, maps, doodles, or natural world paraphernalia. Whatever your medium, materials should be submitted as 300 dpi grayscale images, formatted as .tiff, .png, or .jpg files. With each piece, please specify artist name, name of work, and medium.

Volume V, THE FARMERS NEW DEAL

What emphasis is still missing from the Green New Deal that we read so much about?

We think: Land use! Adaptive, resourceful, responsive re-use is the theme song of the next Almanac.

Imagine the tremendous potential for climate mitigation and resilience if we reconsider habits and conventions of land use that contaminate water, degrade soil, and make our cities dysfunctional despoilers of their ecosystem.

You who are accustomed to making lists of land tasks… let’s look beyond the boundaries of the farms we manage and talk publicly about the changes we could make. All the land around us needs better care, restoration, and refurbishment. 

What do you see? What ideas do you have for WHAT CAN BE DONE on the land? Please take a look around and put your thoughts down on paper, share with us your wild notions and practical thinking for a Farmer’s New Deal.

Didn’t catch the last iteration of the Almanac? Order one now!


reminder: call for submissions to the almanac!

posted January 20, 2016

Time to submit to the NEW FARMER’S ALMANAC vol. III

almanac_etsy

Agrarians and stewards of all types, young and old, seasoned and greenhorn, we want to hear from you! We’ve begun the process of compiling submissions to the New Farmer’s Almanac: vol III. Awash in fascinating content, we want more!

The upcoming Almanac will explore the theme of The Commons, drawing from folklore, mathematical projections, empirical, emotional and geographical observations of theory and praxis. As farmers we hold space in many interwoven commons—the carbon sequestered in the soil, the water cycling through our landscapes, the biodiversity of the insect resources living among our operations, and all the other natural and human-crafted systems in which we function.

Possibilities for our shared future would seem to rest on how these intersecting commons are governed, particularly at the juncture of humanity and ecology where we make our workplace. In re-visiting the Almanac format we assert our version of Americana—one which might better lay the cultural groundwork to serve the information needs of today’s young farmers, field hands, and land workers of all kinds—and equip ourselves for the challenges of rebuilding the food system and restoring a more democratic, more diverse, and more resilient foundation for society.

We face a dystopian future, with guaranteed-unpredictable weather, the impending collapse of the fossil fuel economy, endlessly consolidating monopolies, and a country that is, for the first time in our history, majority urban. That’s why the Almanac is a utopian publication, one that reminds today’s farmers about the foundational concepts of an agrarian democracy—themselves utopian.

But we also reject the self-propelling logic of techno-utopia—dependent upon extraction economies which, through enclosure of common resources, bleed out our land, resources, and people. We orient ourselves instead toward the words of Ursula Le Guin, who reminds us that our intent in utopian thinking should not be “reactionary, nor even conservative, but simply subversive. It seems that the utopian imagination is trapped, like capitalism and industrialism and the human population, in a one-way future consisting only of growth.”

We want to hear from you on your engagements with the Commons and all its intricacies—marine and terrestrial, tragic and elemental, constantly under assault and yet inexorable in the persistence of its promise. Send us astronomical data, exercises in cooperation, reading lists, games, poems, rants, historical accounts, animal handling instructions, illustrations, guides to any and all aspects of farming and stewardship, recipes, health suggestions, thoughts, dreams, plans, schematics, even computer code if you’ve got some that’s applicable. We’re open to everything!

Text submissions should be around 700 words. Visual materials should be submitted as 600 dpi grayscale images, formatted as .tiff, .psd, or .jpg files.

If you’ve got ideas and want to run them by us beforehand, please do so by Jan. 10, 2016. Submissions are due by Feb. 1, 2016!

Send submissions to almanac@thegreenhorns.net

Questions or further information needs? Email us at the above address.

Onward!

Information about the 2015 New Farmer’s Almanac here, for sale here.  More on our 2013 New Farmer’s Almanac (on sale for $20) here. Questions about the 2015 Almanac? Send us an email.

(more…)