a digital map leads to reparations for black and indigenous farmers

posted February 24, 2018

Credit: Soul Fire Farm

Check out this awesome article written by very good friend of the Greenhorns, Jean Willoughby for Yes! Magazine. Jean writes about the recent changes within the farming movement. Her article focuses on the increase in the number of voluntary transfers of land and resources to people of color as a means of reparations for past injustices.

“Last month, Dallas Robinson received an email from someone she didn’t know, asking if she would be open to receiving a large sum of money—with no strings attached. For once, it wasn’t spam. She hit reply.
Robinson is a beginning farmer with experience in organic agriculture, and has had plans to establish the Harriet Tubman Freedom Farm on 10 acres of family land near her home in Rocky Mount, North Carolina. Located in an area where the poverty rate hovers at nearly 20 percent, according to census data, and where both food insecurity and obesity rates are even higher, the farm will focus on serving the needs of the surrounding community by producing vegetables, herbs, and mushrooms.
The gift from the stranger arrived thanks to a new online map, the Black-Indigenous Farmers Reparations Map, a project to promote “people-to-people” reparations.”

The email that Robinson received was from Douglass DeCandia (regular contributor to the Greenhorns New Farmers Almanac!) who had heard Robinson speak at the young farmers conference this year which featured the controversial speech from keynote Mark Bittman. Bittman’s response to those speaking truth to power at the conference was a stark awakening for many and has encouraged many of those who hold power to question how they are holding themselves accountable.

Click HERE to read the full article.

if you wanted to track your local wind patterns…

posted April 12, 2017

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We’ve got another good one for all of our fellow map geeks out there. Sev just learned about Windy TV from the lighthouse keeper in the Azores. The website provides a real-time map visualization of wind and weather patterns around the globe. It allows the user to zero in on a specific address or to get a satellite’s-eye-view of whole continents, and it’s a great tool for educating yourself about about predominant wind patterns and their seasonal variations.

Utility aside, we’d be remiss for not mentioning that the visualization is in and of itself downright gorgeous; as far as we’re concerned this is kind of the best way to spend time on the internet since Google Earth.

Oh, and bonus? Windy TV also provides your local forecast five days out without the encroachment of ads.

It makes so much sense to be as familiar with the wind as you are with your coastline, your local watershed, your local politics…

The air is moving! Can you feel it?!

mapping perennials

posted April 4, 2017

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Ever wish you could find every perennial farm any where you went in the country? Turns out you can. Perennial Map provides a great interactive platform for finding perennial farms across the country. Whether you’re looking to network, hire, or just learn more, farms that raise everything from maple syrup to asparagus are listed here. Is your farm missing from the list? It’s free to create a new posting!

open source mapping through ny public library

posted March 3, 2016


The Lionel Pincus & Princess Firyal Map Division is very proud to announce the release of more than 20,000 cartographic works as high resolution downloads. We believe these maps have no known US copyright restrictions.* To the extent that some jurisdictions grant NYPL an additional copyright in the digital reproductions of these maps, NYPL is distributing these images under a Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication. The maps can be viewed through the New York Public Library’s Digital Collections page, and downloaded (!), through the Map Warper. First, create an account, then click a map title and go. Here’s a primer and more extended blog post on the warper.

To read more, click HERE!

maps showing how maine’s coastline could change

posted July 30, 2015

New sea-level rise forecast is alarming: Here are 10 maps showing how Maine’s coastline could change


This computer-generated image shows what Portland’s Back Cove would look like after a rise in sea level (Natural Resources Council of Maine).

According to a report this week in Slate, a team led by the former lead NASA scientist on climate change is now forecasting a much more rapid and dramatic rise in sea level than was previously expected.


new plant hardiness zone map!

posted February 15, 2012

Check it out, Greenhorns: 2012 Plant Hardiness Zone Map 
You can type in your zipcode or click on any state for a detailed map.  So user friendly!

The 2012 USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map is the standard by which gardeners and growers can determine which plants are most likely to thrive at a location. The map is based on the average annual minimum winter temperature, divided into 10-degree F zones. Compared to the 1990 version, zone boundaries in this edition of the map have shifted in many areas. The new map is generally one 5-degree Fahrenheit half-zone warmer than the previous map throughout much of the United States.

For the first time, the map is available as an interactive GIS-based map, for which a broadband Internet connection is recommended, and as static images for those with slower Internet access. Users may also simply type in a ZIP Code and find the hardiness zone for that area.

10 years of california farmlink

posted November 17, 2009

Technically, if they were farmers, they would no longer qualify under the USDA’s definition of “Beginning Farmer.”

anyway… check them out.  And their snazzy new map of farm opportunities!

On August 30, 2009, California FarmLink and over 100 of its friends, farmers, funders, and new acquaintances wiled away the afternoon at Oak Hill Farm in Glen Ellen, CA, celebrating ten years of working to keep land in agriculture and farmers on that land. (more…)

fabulous quilted maps

posted October 9, 2009

you know we love maps… this is via Brooklyn Based

Remember when you were a kid, and you threw blankets over chairs to make tents? Emily Fischer did that too, but she didn’t think of them as a place to hide. She was creating peaks and valleys — topography — because what she saw was a real-life map. She’s been playing with them ever since, first as an architect, and now as the creator of beautiful quilts of Brooklyn neighborhoods called Soft-Maps. (more…)

mapping the possibilities

posted September 12, 2009

this is from the USDA! (and click on the map to buy our poster…)

Mapping and Modeling Eastern U.S. Food Production
By Ann Perry
September 2, 2009

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists are mapping an array of county-level data from Maine to Virginia on weather, soil, land use, water availability and other elements. Then they’ll use their map to model potential crop production and find out where local food production could meet current and projected demand—and where it won’t.il_430xN.55789066