making the dreamgoats come true

posted April 24, 2016

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In a world that needs new farmers, on land that needs new ways of raising food, and among bodies that need new ways of being nourished, the Dreamgoats aim to maintain natural systems, recycle waste, build soil fertility, and add value to the lives of other beings.

THE DREAM

1. To purchase 3 goat kids & solar-electric fencing & to construct a 4-season, mobile goat-shed
2. To grow the goatherd & the health of the land
using creative grazing strategies
3. To launch a herd-share program by which to share our dairy confections with the community

Learn More HERE

Visit Kickstarter page HERE


maine: goat intensive biochar workshop with shana hanson

posted April 22, 2016

 

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Dear friends,

Sunday at 8 AM Gary Masalin and Shana Hanson will lead an optimum open burn for
biochar in the Rainbow Roof house pasture (striped multicolored roof, 195 Back Belmont Rd. on the north side of the rd. just out of town from Jesse Robbins Rd. by less than half a mile).  Spectators and helpers are invited.

This practice is especially suited to goat farmers feeding high quantities of tree fodder, as we collect a surplus of brush annually, and tend not to have time to move brush to, nor size for, a retort burner.  I use the biochar to seed new pasture species into sod, and
for urine catchment and soil improvement at gates, on paths and in bedding (which later gets spread).  The (usually white) goats like to roll in the charcoal for skin mites – handy labor saver if your desired use requires the biochar to be ground up.

I have a small video camera.  I am hoping that one of you will volunteer to capture our burn process on video, to be of use to others.

RSVP if possible, but certainly you are also welcome to just show up.

Thanks, Shana



baby goats to a good home, west cornwall, vermont

posted February 6, 2016

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Photo compliments of twigfarm.com

Greetings from Twig Farm! We’re a small goat dairy in West Cornwall, Vermont. Kidding season will soon be upon us, and while baby goats are unquestionably most adorable animals of all time, sadly we cannot keep all of our darling doelings. That’s where you come in! Our registered Alpines boast superb genetics, bred for hardiness and superior milk production. (Papers and milk records available upon request.) We’re asking $50 per doeling and are willing to negotiate a reduced fee for larger orders. Happy to disbud them for you free of charge if you like. These ladies will certainly be incredible additions to your herd, enviable backyard milkers or the most personable pets you’ve ever had.

They’ll be available beginning the week of March 7th. To reserve your babies, email laurengitlin@gmail.com with Twig Farm Doelings in the subject. We will notify you when your kiddos have arrived, after which time, you will have a week’s window to retrieve them. For each additional day that we hold them, a small surcharge for food and care will be added to your total. We look forward to hearing from you!



ithaca, ny: 2015 cornell sheep and goat symposium, october 2-4

posted September 14, 2015

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Calling all sheep and goat enthusiasts! Mark your calendar to spend the weekend learning from featured speakers, veterinarians and crop experts at Cornell University. Don’t be afraid to get dirty with hands-on learning opportunities, covering everything from eartagging to foot rot. The three day symposium will wrap-up with two tours at local sheep farms where you will observe new technologies available for artificially rearing suckling lambs and kids. For a full list of workshops and to buy tickets click HERE.


for greenhorns interested in goats

posted March 18, 2013

UVM Extension New Farmer Project Webinar SeriesGuide to Starting a Commercial Goat Dairy

7 PM EST, Tuesday, March 26: Transitioning to a Commercial Goat Dairy: Are you ready?

Carol Delaney, M.S. is a small ruminant dairy specialist and author of A Guide to Starting a Commercial Goat Dairy.  Carol will present the platform and viewpoint to help you lay the framework for running a commercial dairy goat operation.  There will be an emphasis on planning, livestock considerations, budgeting, record keeping, time management and marketing. Formerly with the University of Vermont Department of Animal Science and Extension, 1998-2008, Carol now works as a farmer grant specialist for Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education,  and as a small ruminant consultant.

Newcomers to online learning are welcome. All you need to participate is internet access and a computer that you can hear sound through. To participate, please go to http://go.uvm.edu/aemon at about 6:45 pm EST on March 26, 2013 and click on the webinar title.  For more information, contact newfarmer@uvm.edu or call 802-223-2389×203. If you require accommodations to participate in this program, please let Jessie Schmidt know by March 12, 2013 at 802-223-2389 or 1-866-860-1382 (toll-free in VT) or newfarmer@uvm.edu so we may assist you.


spring equinox goat birth

posted March 21, 2008

Young farmer Novella Carpenter has just welcomed two new Nigerian Dwarf doelings to the world at GhostTown Farm. Here’s their birth announcement, and read more about the birth here on Novella’s blog City Farmer.

Orla, 1 pound

“I ran downstairs and Bebe came running up to me, bleating and looking at me with distress. Tail up. That’s always a sign of pending birth. But I thought it wouldn’t be for another two weeks! Luckily, I’m obsessive, so I had all the supplies—the iodine, the petroleum jelly, gloves, towels, bottles, colostrum, beet pulp and oats—ready to go.” Keep reading…

Spring is here…a bit early.
We joyfully welcomed two new Nigerian Dwarf doelings
to GhostTown Farm:

Orla
Weighing 1 pound
and
Georgina Blaze
Weighing 1.3 pounds

Georgina Blaze

on St. Patrick’s Day, March 17, 2008 at 3:30pm
Half Pint Bebe and National Hero are the proud parents

We hope they’ll be champion milkers!

With Love,
Farmer Novella