apocalypse pig

posted November 26, 2015

The last antibiotics begin to fail…

http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/files/2015/11/Clemson-pig-e1448140337896.jpg

 

On Thursday, researchers from several Chinese, British and US universities announced in the journal Lancet Infectious Diseases that they have identified a new form of resistance, to the very last-ditch drug colistin—and that it is present in both meat animals and people, probably comes from agricultural use of that drug, can move easily among bacteria, and may already be spreading across borders.

This is very bad news. To read more, click HERE.


rice growing regions in china are more cooperative, interdependent

posted October 9, 2014

This story is part of National Geographic‘s special eight-month Future of Food series.

Rice and wheat do more than feed the world. They have also affected the way we think—in dramatically different ways.

That is the result of a study published Thursday in Science comparing people from different parts of China. Researchers led by Thomas Talhelm of the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, found that people from rice-growing regions think in more interdependent and holistic ways than do those from wheat-growing areas.

Talhelm thinks these differences arose because it takes much more cooperation and overall effort to grow rice than wheat. To successfully plant and harvest rice, farmers must work together to build complex irrigation systems and set up labor exchanges. Over time, this need for teamwork fosters an interdependent and collectivist psychology. To read more, click HERE!


china refuses gmo corn from USA, cargill loses 90 million dollars

posted September 12, 2014

CHICAGO, Sept 12 (Reuters) – Cargill Inc has suffered more than $90 million in damages from China’s rejections of U.S. corn containing a genetically modified trait developed by Syngenta AG, the grain trader said in a lawsuit on Friday.

The damages are a “direct and proximate result” of Syngenta’s decision to sell its Agrisure Viptera corn, known as MIR 162, before China approved the variety for import, according to the lawsuit.

Cargill sued a unit of Syngenta, the world’s largest crop chemicals company, in Louisiana state court for damages stemming from the rejections. To read more about this AGRIBUSINESS DRAMA, CLICK HERE!


alert! china wants the usa to import their apples

posted July 19, 2014

Nothing about the proposed lifting of this [no apples from China] regulation is good for American fruit growers or consumers. Aside from reducing the already meager profit margins of the fruit farmer by the addition of a new (HUGE) apple supplier, the importation of Chinese apples opens up the possibility of introducing foreign pest and disease, which can affect many more fruits than just apples and make growing organic even more difficult. Also, the way these apples are grown in China is not regulated.  Many Chinese apple orchards are located on sites with detectable arsenic in the groundwater and the long-outlawed arsenic-based pesticide spray is still in use there, leading to the discovery of arsenic levels in some samples of Chinese apple juice exceeding federal US drinking-water standards.

PLEASE CLICK HERE AND TAKE A MINUTE TO SUBMIT A COMMENT TO THE USDA/APHIS

Taken from regulations.gov: “The regulations in “Subpart—Fruits and Vegetables” (7 CFR 319.56-1 through 319.56-68, referred to below as the regulations) prohibit or restrict the importation of fruits and vegetables into the United States from certain parts of the world to prevent the introduction and dissemination of plant pests that are new to or not widely distributed within the United States.

The national plant protection organization (NPPO) of China has requested that the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) amend the regulations to allow apples (Malus pumila) from China to be imported into the continental United States.

 

 


china’s new agrarians

posted June 3, 2014

How China’s young idealists are turning to the soil
by Carrie Gracie for the BBC

china

In June 1989, on the orders of China’s ruling Communist Party, the army crushed pro-democracy demonstrations in Tiananmen Square, killing hundreds of people. Twenty-five years on, a different type of protest against the values of modern China has emerged.

My hunt for China’s young idealists, the inheritors of the Tiananmen spirit, started with a three hour drive through snarled traffic. Ironically the route took me first across the north end of Tiananmen Square, under the gaze of Chairman Mao’s portrait on the gate of heavenly peace.

Then west along the avenue of eternal tranquillity, the very same route the tanks took in the opposite direction 25 years ago, rumbling into the heart of Beijing to kill both an untold number of young people and the idealism of a generation.

These public spaces haven’t changed much, but the Beijing beyond is unrecognisable from the one the students marched through a quarter of a century ago. No more mule carts, markets and teeming brick alleys. Beijing has supersized – it’s now all six-lane ring roads, high rise glass and concrete.

The young idealists I was hunting had renounced city life and decamped to the countryside. After much to-ing and fro-ing on bumpy tracks, we finally stumbled upon a flaking sign proclaiming the Righteous Path farm.

continue reading HERE