free the land

posted April 28, 2016

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In this month’s issue of Vice magazine, Vice took a long look at one answer to that question in Jackson, Mississippi. There, in 2013, voters elected black-nationalist lawyer Chokwe Lumumba as mayor based on promises of direct democracy and cooperative enterprise. Lumumba died unexpectedly less than a year later, but the story of what he tried to carry out in Jackson remains a possible future for Black Lives Matter—especially now that BLM spokesman DeRay Mckesson is running for the mayor’s office in Baltimore.

“Katrina taught us a lot of lessons,” Rukia Lumumba said. The group started to think about the need to control the seats of government, and to control land. “Without land, you really don’t have freedom.”

To read more about Lumumba, a Jackson Mississippi black lives matter activist, and his death 8 months after becoming the Mayor of Jackson in a landslide victory, click HERE!

 


kale, racial justice, and reclaiming our collective right to the earth

posted April 5, 2016

 

A beautiful walk around Soul Fire Farm with the thoughtful, insightful, and fiercely passionate Leah Penniman. This film was produced by The Next System Project and the Laura Flanders Show, as part of their series on gender, race, and the next system.

I’d write more about the farm, but my paraphrasing would never be as powerful as their own words: “Soul Fire Farm is committed to ending racism and injustice in the food system. We raise life-giving food and act in solidarity with people marginalized by food apartheid. With deep reverence for the land and wisdom of our ancestors, we work to reclaim our collective right to belong to the earth and to have agency in the food system. We bring diverse communities together on this healing land to share skills on sustainable agriculture, natural building, spiritual activism, health and environmental justice. We are training the next generation of activist-farmers and strengthening the movements for food sovereignty and community self-determination.”


scientific american chimes in on beyonce’s “formation”

posted February 11, 2016

Beyoncé’s “Formation” makes many statements about social and political realities in the U.S., but song and video perhaps speak especially strongly to black women in academia.

Truly, Formation by Beyoncé is the hype track of Black Women everywhere, but Academia is such a special place that I feel it has an especially stark meaning to those of us roaming the hallowed halls of higher education. Let me break it down for you. Lyrics in italics.

Y’all haters corny with that illuminati mess

1. Often when black women in academia speak out against the intersectional injustices we endure, unsupportive colleagues and wobbly allies are quick to tell us we are whining or making things up. Gaslighting is the oldest deflection tactic in the book.

Paparazzi, catch my fly, and my cocky fresh

2. If we dare show any spunk or “sassiness” or what I like to call simply personality then we have to navigate a minefield of mumbles & microaggressions all because some folks who can’t handle ALL of the FABULOUSNESS we serve!

To read more, click HERE!