Greenhorns 2016 Impact Report

posted December 21, 2016

 

On this winter’s solstice, along with traditions of stoking the hearth and nestling fireside, we thought to drop a line on the past season.

In 2016 our Greenhorns network surpassed 62,000 – a community within reach of our media projects, news and inspiration. We are continuously working to broaden and diversify our network of new agrarians, to bring the voices, testimony and success stories of today’s new agrarians to ever more aspirants and students. Please take a moment to review our 2016 impact report for all the clever details.

Thanks to your support, we continue to grow stronger.

Happy Winter, The Greenhorns’ Team

greenhorns-impact-report-2016-final_page_1

greenhorns-impact-report-2016-final_page_2

greenhorns-impact-report-2016-final_page_3

greenhorns-impact-report-2016-final_page_4

 

 

 


agrarian trust in the news

posted November 20, 2016

hands2

You may have missed this in the swamp of election news last week: In These Times published this excellent run-down of Agrarian Trust, the recent symposium, and the land use problems that challenge regional food systems.

“Increasingly, communities recognize that a regional farm economy is more responsive, adaptive, resilient and culturally satisfying,” says von Tscharner Fleming. “We want more diverse, more local, less thirsty, more prosperous regional food systems. It is in this context that we talk about land access for incoming farmers, about successful businesses, and about land transition for existing farms and retiring farmers, as well as mechanisms for restoration of degraded ecological features and infrastructures.”


our land 2: moving towards an autonomous food system, NM, nov 9-15

posted October 19, 2016

agra_add_161012_b
OUR LAND 2!
November 9-17th, in Albuquerque and Santa Fe New Mexico.
ALL THE INFORMATION IS HERE: www.agrariantrust.org/2016symposium
This will be the second Agrarian Trust OUR LAND symposium, and once again we’ve got speakers from around the country and around the region focusing our attention, analysis, activism and collective agency on issues relevant to your regional foodshed.
This event is presented by Agrarian Trust and has a focus on Land access, land transition and the issues underlying ownership and management of the territory required for an autonomous and sovereign food system.
The central themes of this symposium center on land-use and governance regimes of the southwest region.  We will learn about the acequias, a system of irrigation ditch commons brought by the Spanish. The history, management regimes and future prospects of this system represent a powerful curriculum for other commons-based systems. Can these ditch commons be explained to include their uplands and headwaters, or will ditch rights be lost to privatization and sold to developers?

(more…)


Agrarian Trust Symposium speaker Kim Stringfellow’s cool ass project!

posted July 5, 2016

3871694358_3e74856053_b
The Mojave Project is really just kind of the bomb-diggety. But don’t take our word for it: to learn more, we recommend this absolutely gorgeous video. The project is an “experimental transmedia documentary led by Kim Stringfellow exploring the physical, geological and cultural landscape of the Mojave Desert.” Browse the current projects here.

And while we’re talking about the Mojave Project, they’re asking you to
SAVE THE DATE!
WHAT: We pleased to send you this SAVE THE DATE announcement about our autumn program OUR LAND 2: Tracing the Acequia Commons, a series of talks, exhibits and happenings to advance the broadening discourse on land commons and farmland futures.

WHERE: New Mexico! Most events Free and open to the public.

WHEN: November 9-17th in close association with the Quivira Coalition and Biodynamic Association annual conferences, Agrarian Trust invites you to join us in fine company  to approach topics of Public Trust, Acequia traditions and commons culture, emergent urban commons, water enclosures and new topographics; through lectures, documentary films, open archive exhibits and an walk along an Acequia irrigation ditch, flowing continuously for four centuries.

WHO: Mary Wood, Rick Prelinger, Kim Stringfellow, Tezozomoc, Devon Pena, Ruth Breach, Stanley Crawford, Wes Jackson, Emily Vogler, Ildi Carlisle-Cummins, Eric Holt Gimenez, Kate Levy… and more

 


amazing european organization and ahead of the game when it comes to land access!

posted October 29, 2015

Our organizations work together to strengthen practical knowledge – on both problems and solutions – in the field of access to land for agroecological farmers. We thereby aim to promote the emergence and consolidation of grassroots initiatives, working towards securing access to land and land stewardship, as well as fostering a broader evolution of national and EU policies and regulations on land use and management.

Project aims:

1- Strengthen practical knowledge to secure good land access

• Identifying relevant national organisations
• Understanding options for land tenure
• Developing specific knowledge and resources about several areas of work

2- Build citizen support for land access
• Building up knowledge and skills of volunteers/ local groups/ the public on European land context
• Engaging with other CSOs, in particular CSAs, farmers’ organisations, rural development organisations and others.

3- Contribute to the evolution of the support system for farmers’

For more information about this amazing website, click HERE!


a new economy on the land: severine fleming, agrarian

posted July 13, 2015

SEVERINE FLEMING, Agrarian

A New Economy on the Land
Severine Fleming
Severine is a farmer, activist, and organizer based in the Champlain Valley of New York. She is founder and director of The Greenhorns, a grassroots cultural organization with the mission to promote, recruit and support a growing movement of young farmers and ranchers in America.

The entering generation of Agrarians has demonstrated a bold vision to build thousands of farm businesses for local food security. We need many more to succeed. Many who try are confounded when they try to find durable land access and tenure. Severine argues that we need to design and enact new frameworks for community land-ownership. All of us benefit from the revival of these farm-steads, and the initiatives of young farmers, orchardists, and dairymen and women. Today, the macro-economy imposes extraction, speculation and degradation of our land, but that will not worktomorrow. How can our water-shed, our food-shed, and the historic cultural landscape inform the new economy we need? How can eaters reconnect meaningfully with both the eco-system and economic system that will sustain the quality of the places we love?


more land access training workshops for new york

posted May 1, 2014

american farmland trust

Agrarian Trust’s May 3rd training workshop with the NY State Agricultural Mediation Program (NYAMP), Negotiation Your Way to Land, is SOLD OUT. You can get a podcast of the program by joining the Agrarian Trust email list.

For those of you in the Hudson Valley, there are two more workshops coming up THIS weekend, hosted by the the Hudson Valley Farmlink Network (HVFN), a project of the American Farmland Trust (AFT) and a partnership of organizations dedicated to improving access to farmland for next generation farmers.

These workshops are focused on farm leasing for farmers and landowners, include farm leasing panels and networking sessions, and will take place in Ulster County and Orange County on May 4th and May 6th, respectively. The workshops will feature panel discussions with local farmers, landowners and attorneys with leasing experience and cover issues including: farm leasing basics; legal issues; farmer and landowner perspectives on what works; common mistakes to avoid; and negotiating the right farm lease for your situation. There will also be opportunities for informal networking sessions with regional farmers and landowners to explore potential matches and to further develop leasing plans.

The May 4 Ulster County workshop will be held at the Ulster County Fairgrounds in the 4-H Youth Building, 249 Libertyville Road, New Paltz from 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. To register call 845-340-3990 or email to: emh56@cornell.edu.  The cost of the workshop is $5 per person and includes snacks and drinks. Pre-register by May 1.

The May 6 Orange County workshop will be held at Kaplan Hall, The Great Room at SUNY Orange Newburgh Campus, One Washington Center, Newburgh from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.   To register, call 845-344-1234 or send email to: mru2@cornell.edu. The cost of this workshop is $10 for an individual or $15 for a farm or family and includes snacks and drinks. Pre-register by May 2.

Funding for both workshops is provided by the United States Department of Agriculture Risk Management Agency.

For more information about these workshops and other Hudson Valley Farmlink Network projects, contact Tim Biello at tbiello@farmland.org.

 


negotiation training

posted April 14, 2014

May 3 Negotiation Training Workshop
Agrarian Trust has an upcoming negotiation training workshop in the Hudson Valley. The workshop will be held at the beautiful Carey Conference Center, located on an historic 100-acre estate overlooking Lake Myosotis in Rensselaerville, New York. Experts from NYS Agricultural Mediation Program and the New York State Dispute Resolution Association will provide the negotiation and business communication training.

This workshop is for farmland-seekers and professionals that provide technical assistance around land and capital access and transition. More information is also on the Agrarian Trust (website more schedule and program details coming soon):http://agrariantrust.org/may-training-workshop/

2014 land access symposium

posted February 21, 2014

ag trust poster
Agrarian Trust, a program of the Schumacher Center for New Economics, is pleased to announce the schedule and line-up for our 2014 Land Access Symposium.
In the next 20 years, an estimated 400 million acres of farmland will change hands, as the 70% of farmland owners over the age of 65 retire and pass away. Meanwhile, entering farmers struggle to compete non-farming landowners for access to prime farmland, particularly in areas close to metropolitan areas. (more…)