hawaii to ny in a double hulled sailing canoe

posted May 19, 2016

Hōkūleʻa, our Star of Gladness, began as a dream of reviving the legacy of exploration, courage, and ingenuity that brought the first Polynesians to the archipelago of Hawaiʻi. The canoes that brought the first Hawaiians to their island home had disappeared from earth. Cultural extinction felt dangerously close to many Hawaiians when artist Herb Kane dreamed of rebuilding a double-hulled sailing canoe similar to the ones that his ancestors sailed. Though more than 600 years had passed since the last of these canoes had been seen, this dream brought together people of diverse backgrounds and professions. Since she was first built and launched in the 1970s, Hōkūle’a continues to bring people together from all walks of life. She is more than a voyaging canoe—she represents the common desire shared by the people of Hawaii, the Pacific, and the World to protect our most cherished values and places from disappearing.

To learn more, click HERE!


free webinar on collaborative trade and fair markets

posted April 5, 2016

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Yellow Seed, a nonprofit organization that facilitates connections between farmers and fair markets, recently partnered with Impact Hub Berkley, a social impact working hub out of the Bay Area, to host six curated working groups to focus on Collaborative Trade. The project was called From the Ground Up: Change Accelerator and aimed to “design healthy, global food supply chains where farmers are treated as equal partners and like-minded organizations work together to accelerate the shift towards sustainability.”

Small farmers, social justice groups, and some big names of the chocolate industry participated. (See the Yellow Seed blog for more detailed information!) To bring the sessions to a close, the groups are inviting anyone interested to take place in a webinar that will present the key findings of the working groups. The “welcome all curious minds, open hearts and everyone interested in learning about how we can revolutionize our global food supply chains together.”

Anyone interested has the choice of joining either of the two webinars:

Session A: Fri, Apr. 8, 2016 12:00PM – 1:30PM PDT

Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/521009293
You can also dial in using your phone: United States +1 (312) 757-3121
Access Code: 521-009-293

Session B: Mon, Apr. 11, 2016 6:30pm – 8:00pm PDT
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/413804301
You can also dial in using your phone: United States +1 (224) 501-3212
Access Code: 413-804-301



severine and the last american food commons, part I

posted January 10, 2016

 

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This past Fall, Severine travelled to beautiful Alaska and wrote three comprehensive articles based on her experience for In These Times. From Halibut festivals to fish processing boats to the rugged Alaskan homesteaders, she explores three questions fundamental to her journey:

  • What can the farming community learn from the highly managed, and highly abundant commons of Alaska? Are these lessons applicable to land?
  • What do young agrarians have to learn from the governance and politics of a wild fishery?
  • What does a wild fishery have to learn from the cultural activities of agrarian organizers?

Convinced? You can read the three articles, Part I, Part II, and Part III on In These Times.

But maybe you’re still not sure why young farmers should care about the ocean? We’ll be posting a few short excerpts on the blog throughout day, and we suspect they might just change your mind.

 


sail freight projects abound! meet the new FoodBargeHack @ It Takes a Region

posted November 1, 2015

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We are SO HAPPY to see continued discussion of SAIL FREIGHT!

As you may remember, we’ve been obsessed since our first sail freight project in VERMONT a few years ago, and then again in with Maine Sail Freight this past August.

Like they said in the Portland Press Herald:

“It’s art. It’s protest. It’s celebration. And, who knows? It may even be a practical way to get cargo to market.”

AND NOW, inspired by Sail Freight and Farm Hack, there will be a FoodBarge Hack lunch Friday Nov. 13, at NEWSAG‘s It Takes a Region Conference. The event’s organizer’s write:

“Together, we will envision an energy efficient, sustainable regional food system using our waterways. We will focus on how to connect mid-sized upstate farmers with underserved NYC neighborhoods using a barge on the Hudson River, and challenge the status quo. With your help, we want take real steps towards a viable alternative to food filled trucks on our roads.”

Please note that you must be attending the conference and should RSVP to Jill Slater in advance if you would like lunch.


more fish in the sea

posted August 16, 2015

trout-539599_1280NPR’s The Salt on “Why 500 Million Seafood Meals Get Dumped in the Sea.”

Because I am willing to bet that– at least when it comes to the readers of this blog– the woman quoted at the end of the article is wrong.

“People don’t want to know all this,” she says. “In general, they just want to know what [color-coded label] to look for.”

This post brought to you by our continued excitement for Maine Sail Freight.


two chances to hear songs of maine by away down east this week

posted August 15, 2015

note: this is not actually the From Down East. This is the cover of a beautiful volume by William Blake (also comes highly recommended).
note: this is not actually the From Down East. This is the cover of a beautiful volume by William Blake (also comes highly recommended).

Can You Sing “Maine”?
Songs of Maine’s Fishermen, Sailors, Lumberjacks, River Drivers, & Shore Workers

featuring: From Away Downeast, America’s Easternmost Chantey Group will be playing the fiddle, guitar, banjo, and harmonica this week in Maine, and we highly recommend you make it one (if not both) of the shows. Singing along is strongly encouraged, and family members of all ages are welcome to attend.

First, they will performing Monday, August 17th at 7:00 p.m. at the Indian River Community Association at 1440 Indian River Road in Addison, ME. Admission to this event will be by donation to the building repair fund. For more information, email rick@snyderman-works.com or call 207-497-2450.

Then! On Wednesday, August 19th, Songs of Maine will continue with a FREE SHOW at the Pembroke Library on 221 Old County Road, Pembroke, ME, opposite the fair grounds and horse track. For more information on this show, call 207-726-4747, 726-4745, or email seasongs@207me.com


sail freight in the news

posted July 26, 2015

  

Maine Sail Freight offers a new way to think about trade

By Severine von Tscharner Fleming

What do we who produce food from the land and sea have in common? For one thing, a changing climate. Changes in the weather have big impacts on the businesses and industries that straddle nature and the market.
Another challenge is that farmers and fisher people are getting older, and both industries are critically reliant on young people entering the work.
But both farming and fishing show there are new ways forward, including alternative value-chains that respect the people and places involved.

Read more over at The Working Waterfront!


happening today in portland, me!

posted July 20, 2015

  Come visit the young farmers who are coordinating this futurist pageant of logistics, using the power of the wind to capture imaginations and new markets for the rural economies of this tall state.  And come see the wooden schooner, the Harvey Gamage, a 131 foot schooner that will carry the cargo southwards.  Saturday, Sunday and Monday (July 18-20) they’ll be tabling with their wares as part of the TALL SHIPS CHALLENGE in Portland Maine. On Monday they’re throwing a “ TTIP Afterparty” at Thompson’s Point, on the waterfront in Portland Maine with four amazing live bands and a teach in by Food and Water Watch’s Sarah Alexander. Bands Include: The Parlor, Will Dailey and the Milk and Honey Rebellion