mofga charcuterie workshop

posted December 15, 2017

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Join Andy Smith of Smith’s Smokehouse and delve into the basics of charcuterie through a series of four workshops. Learn how to create your own charcuterie goods, and potential business, and then dig deep into a variety of curing processes including bacon, bresaola, beef jerky and more!

Don’t forget to register for this course, there are only 10 spots available. The complete series is $350 for MOFGA members and $400 for non-members. Each course will take place at Smith’s Smokehouse; bring your own lunch.

Click HERE to register and please contact Anna Mueller at events@mofga.org if you have any questions.


the world’s first mycology school!

posted December 14, 2017

MYCOLOGOS is the world’s first online and in-person mycology school and demonstration mushroom farm, based in Portland, Oregon. They are currently raising funds through a Kickstarter campaign (ending December 20) where you can save up to 80% off online courses in mycology. The founder of mycologos, Peter McCoy will be teaching a Greenhorns mycology workshop in our new headquarters in Maine next Summer. Email greenhornsoffice@gmail.com to express your interest in this July 2018 class.
Click HERE to check out the kickstarter, there is only 6 days left to donate!

haydens harvest for the year ahead

posted December 6, 2017

credit: Hayden Stubbins – Forest and Feast at Yale

It’s been a busy year for Hayden Stubbins from Hayden’s Harvest. He hosted forage and feasts, plant walks, mycology talks and herbal classes in North America, from NYC to coastal Maine. Check out his cool video about Forage and Feast that has over 1 million views HERE

Hayden has been involved with some really interesting projects on subjects such as Lyme Disease and invasive species over the past year:

Japanese Barberry: A story of Lyme Disease, invasive species, medicine, and scarves

Japanese Barberry creates ideal habitat for ticks, and has been attributed to the rise in Lyme Disease. More barberry = more ticks = more Lyme Disease. I have shifted my winter focus to finding products using Japanese Barberry with the hopes of decreasing its population in our woods with the aim of decreasing rates of Lyme Disease. These products include potential medicine (type II diabetes, fatty liver disease, statin-resistant high cholesterol, digestive issues), as a dye, bitters, and more to come. If you are interested in Japanese Barberry removal, any of the products listed above, or a monograph, please contact me.

He is currently taking booking for his spring teaching schedule, so if you or any organizations you know are interested in hosting a Forage and Feast, plant walk, mycology talk, herbalism event. These events are perfect for public and private schools, universities, youth groups, farms, community centers, and private residences alike. Many people have celebrated their birthdays at a Forage and Feast, so why not book a private Forage and Feast for you and your loved ones to celebrate a special day?

If you have any questions, are interested in getting involved with any of the above projects, or if you would like to host an event, please be in touch with Hayden at haydenstebbins@gmail.com.


agriculture, labor and the law

posted November 22, 2017

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New Entry Sustainable Farming Project & the Conservation Law Foundation are teaming up to hold a workshop that will provide an overview of key employment issues that farmers need to know. The workshop will be presented by Mary O’Neal, Partner at Conn Kavanaugh, and employment law expert. From apprenticeships to agricultural minimum wage, the workshop will cover key topics that come up on the farm and provide attendees with an agricultural employment law handbook. It will also include case studies that provide an opportunity to apply the topics to real situations.
The workshop will take place on Tuesday December 12, 2017 at 4:00 PM at the University of Massachusetts in Dartmouth. It is free to attend, however please make sure that you register in advance HERE.

open gate field day: ortensi farm ny

posted October 24, 2017

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credit: HMI
Open Gate: Ortensi Farm Day
November 11, 2017
Ortensi Farm in Richfield Springs, NY
Tickets $25, includes lunch!

 

Ortensi Farm Day is part of HMI’s Open Gate Learning Series. Open Gates are peer-to-peer action-based learning days with short presentations and small group exercises geared for participants to share discoveries and management techniques with guidance from experienced facilitators and producers. Holistic Management works with nature, not against it. The day will include discussions about planet and animal-friendly management techniques that lead to richer soil, improved water containment, nutrient-dense food, more successful farms and ranches, and thriving communities.

Register HERE  before November 3rd to take part in this on-the-ground learning day, connect with others who care about a healthy food system and help strengthen your local communities.

 




check out this amazing workshop on managing cattle, soil health, and local food economies in colorado.

posted October 10, 2017

11226771_659557294177782_1409123589_nThis workshop takes place on October 18th – 19th at Adams State University.  It is led by Dr. Allen Williams, a champion of the grass-fed beef industry as well as cutting edge grazing methodology. Dr. Williams helps restore natural soil water retention and reduce runoff, increase land productivity, enhance plant and wildlife biodiversity, and produce healthier food. In fact, he developed many of the original grass-fed protocols and technologies now adopted by the grass-fed sector.

This workshop focuses on the connection between cattle management and healthy soils as part of the local food economy. The Field Day on the second day focuses on details important to local cattle producers in managing and assessing their operations, maximizing quality, and ensuring soil and human health.

To see the full programme click HERE

To register, click HERE


cool free upcoming restorative agriculture field days in the midwest!

posted September 4, 2017

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credit: Savanna Institute

The Savanna Institute is running two free restorative agriculture field days in Wisconsin this month and next. Everybody is welcome and attendees will have the opportunity to learn more about agroforestry first-hand from farmers and researchers who work with perennial crop and livestock enterprises. The first of the two is on September 8th and the second is October 4th.

 

 September 8th @ 1 pm 

Feral Farm & Glacierland RC&D,
N2437 Brattset Lane,
Jefferson, WI

Agroforestry & Long-Term Leases:

Feral Farm grows a diversity of tree crops in polyculture rows with hay alley cropped between, with an increasing emphasis on chestnuts. It is made possible by a unique long-term land access arrangement with Brattsett Family Farm, a grass-fed beef farm. Both farm operations have learned a lot about working collaboratively between an established farmer and a beginning one.

 

October 4 @ 9:30 am

Green Fire Farm,

N5305 Ringhand Road,
Monticello, WI

Silvopasture Establishment with Pastured Pigs, Adaptive Grazing

Join Jacob and nonprofit, extension, and agency personnel, for a field day highlighting how a conventional row crop operation is transitioning to multi-species pasture systems. We’ll talk about silvopasture establishment research, cost-share opportunities, techniques to extend the grazing season, and mentorship programs. Come see pigs and sheep rotationally graze in their two-year old silvopasture planting, a beef herd grass-finishing on fall interseeded annuals, a production flock of pastured laying hens, and a rainfall and erosion simulator.


carbon farming workshop: sequestering carbon for climate change mitigation

posted August 27, 2017

Carbon Poster 2.jpgBelieve it or not, there is some good news about climate change; agriculture, if done correctly can play a powerful role in removing carbon from the atmosphere where it is wreaking havoc. This can be done by taking carbon from the atmosphere and putting it into the soil where it has the power to increase fertility, hold water, and improve crop yields. Learn more at the one-day Carbon Farming workshop in October as part of the Marin Carbon Project.