temple-wilton

credit: temple-wilton community farm


Temple-Wilton Community Farm is seeking a vegetable and/or cheese apprentice for the months of September and October, 2018. There is space for two candidates but it is possible the right person could split time between both operations if so interested. Besides the many hours dedicated to training, you will be provided with a bedroom in a beautiful apartment with other farm workers, access to all foods produced by the farm, WiFi, and a stipend of $500/ month.
About the Temple-Wilton Community farm:
The Temple-Wilton Community Farm was formed during the winter of 1985/1986 and is the oldest continuously operating CSA in the United States. They produce a full range of vegetables for our CSA members, including many storage vegetables that take them through the winter and into the following spring. They also provide milk, yogurt, cheese, eggs and meat for our members and sell surplus to the public. In addition they buy in a number of other items which are also for sale to the public in our farm store. In 2016 they became a Member Owned Cooperative. See twcfarm.com for more information.
Here is what they have to say about the apprenticeships on offer:
Vegetable Apprenticeship
As the planting phase of our season has come to a close, work with vegetables will center around cultivating and harvesting a diversity of crops with special emphasis on harvesting our storage crops to last us through the winter-- carrots, parsnips, beets, potatoes, endive, celeriac, turnips, radishes, rutabaga, etc. Other tasks will include regular setup of our farm store, clearing and laying the fields to rest in cover crops, making compost with crop residues, making and spraying biodynamic preparations, and planting garlic to be overwintered.
The rhythm of the work is determined entirely by the needs of the many different crops that we grow, so our schedules must be very flexible. In general, the work day will be from 7am to 12:30pm and 2pm until 5-6pm depending on what tasks need to be completed. Sundays are generally off but there are some exceptions, especially during the big harvest season when we all need to be fully available to meet the needs of the farm.
As a member of the vegetable crew you would be working with head gardener Jacob Holubeck and two other apprentices. Depending on how the season unfolds there may be opportunities to continue on as well. If you enjoy fall in New England and productive work outdoors, this may be the opportunity you have been waiting for!
If you are interested in applying for the work in the vegetable fields please contact Jacob Holubeck at [email protected], or call him at 603-831-1213.
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Cheese Apprenticeship
Abbot Hill Creamery offers a practical training in cheese making. What you learn will depend mostly on what you wish to learn and are capable of. There is also space to do your own projects, such as making or developing a new cheese.
Necessary Qualities of a Cheese Apprentice:
  • Loves cheese!
  • Sincere interest in learning how to make and sell cheese
  • Hard working
  • Pays meticulous attention to detail and order
  • Gives attention to cleanliness and takes joy in cleaning (70% of cheese making is washing things)
  • Always tries to give their best
  • Ability to work alone and take on responsibilities
Computer skills are welcome as well as a willingness to do some chores on the farm. A love for animals is much appreciated.
What you will learn:
  • How to make many different kinds of cheese including (but not limited to) Gouda, Alpine Style, Quark, Blue Cheese, Camembert, Parmesan, Mozzarella, and Feta
  • How to make yoghurt
  • Cave Management (washing, brining, flipping, and overall age management of cheese)
  • Selling cheese
If you are interested in making cheese with their small and diverse creamery, please contact their friendly cheese maker Benjamin at [email protected]

agrihoods

Image Credit: REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson


Have you heard about agrihoods? The concept has been gaining popularity over the last few years and the term is short for "agricultural neighbourhoods". Agricultural neighbourhoods is an unusual concept. Agricultural tends to conjure images of rural living, open spaces and sprawling farmland. Neighbourhoods on the other hand bring to mind images of suburbia or urban spaces - densely populated concrete jungles. The idea of an agrihood fuses these two very different concepts into something new and they are being heralded as a creation of millennials.
Reading the recent piece in the World Economic Forum on agrihoods, I couldn't help but think back to the stories I have heard about wartime London, where public spaces were transformed into allotments to help people grow food for themselves. While this was primarily a government response to wartime food shortages that ceased shortly after the war, it makes for an interesting comparison nonetheless. Humans have been intentionally cultivating and growing food for 12,000, agriculture is the foundation of human civilisation and is something inherent in human nature. In time of hardship we turn away from importing food and grow it for ourselves instead.
Agrihoods, as far as I can tell do not spring from a lack of food or resources, but instead seem to be a creation of young, wealthy people with ample resources. "Agrihoods are designed to appeal to young, active families who love to eat healthy and spend time outdoors — and they're not off the grid." They are intentional communities designed to be working and sustainable living spaces. They represent a "confluence of economic profits, environmental good, and social benefit" that appeals to the millennial mindset.
The WE Forum article also makes an interesting comparison between the agrihood of today and the golf course preferred by our predecessors. In fact, in Palm Springs CA, developers are ripping out an 18 hole golf course in order to turn it into a olive grove which will serve as the epicentre for an agrihood called Miarlon.
I am excited about the potential of agrihoods. The more sustainable agriculture that we are practicing close to home the better for a multitude of reasons (not least that no food tastes as good as the food that you have grown and picked yourself). However in reading about these shiny new developments, I cannot help but be concerned that agrihoods may very well become the golf courses of tomorrow. With prices between $300,000 and $700,000 for a house in the Miralon community, only the already wealthy millennials will be able to benefit from this new trend. "Wealthy" is not a term typically used to describe millennials, so I have to wonder, who are these agrihoods being built for? What do you think? Let us know in the comments!
Click HERE to read the full article on the World Economic Forum


Friend of the Greenhorns Ethan Soloviev has just relaunched his new blog after a 10 year hiatus from writing. His new blog will focus on regenerative agriculture regenerative business and life! We are so happy to welcome him back to the writing world and are very excited for his upcoming guest post for the Greenhorns blog! In anticipation, we are sharing his recent post "Top Regenerative Agriculture Videos".
Ethan spoke to twenty thousand people and asked them for their top 3 videos that they would show someone to introduce them to regenerative agriculture. Out of all of the responses that he received, he has compiled 2 categories, each containing 3 videos. The first category is “Start Here” containing videos that are 20 minutes or less long. The second category is “Go Deeper” and contains 3 videos that are an hour or more long.
Check out Ethan's original post to see his methodology, comments and selected videos HERE. We have included one of the "Start Here" videos Life in Syntrophy above. "Life in Syntropy" a short film, released in 2015 by Agenda Gotsch. It was made specially to be presented at COP21 - Paris. It compiles some of the most remarkable experiences in Syntropic Agriculture including interviews with those intimately involved in life in syntrophy.

solar apiary

credit: SolarCulture


SolarCulture (a PineGate Renewables project), is an initiative developed to enhance environmental stewardship, promote sustainable agriculture, and collaborate with the community to support research with a goal of encouraging smarter solar through science. They have just recently opened a solar apiary in Jackson County, Oregon. The project is two pronged, it aims to tackle both our fossil fuel dependance as well as our rapidly declining numbers of bees.
After examining the site’s seed mix, vegetation management plan, and early growth of native flowers and grasses, John Jacob of Old Sol Apiaries determined the site would offer safe refuge for his 48 hives of honey bees.
“In 2016/17, Oregon beekeepers reported losing nearly one-third of all honey bee colonies statewide,” said Jacob. “The pollinator-friendly solar sites Pine Gate Renewables is developing can play an important role in helping address the population crisis among our managed and native pollinators.”
Data from the UK shows that pollinator-friendly solar arrays result in increased abundance of bees and other insects, which can provide important pollination and pest management services to crops. “Examining the Potential for Agricultural Benefits from Pollinator Habitat at Solar Facilities in the United States,” a recent peer-reviewed study published in Environmental Science & Technology, identified more than 16,000 acres of pollinator dependent crops in proximity of 204 megawatts of solar arrays throughout Oregon.
Praised by several of the nation’s most prominent entomologists, including MacArthur “Genius” award recipient Dr. Marla Spivak and Presidential Medal of Science recipient Dr. May Berenbaum, pollinator-friendly solar arrays are different than traditional arrays. Pollinator friendly solar sites use low-growing meadows of native flowers and grasses to enrich top soils, capture storm water, and benefit pollinators. All SolarCulture sites meet the specific criteria established by entomologists to qualify as pollinator-friendly.
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We've written about the Maine Rice Project before, it is a non-profit with a mission to get more people to grow and eat sustainably grown rice and grain throughout Maine. It is the brainchild of Ben and Asher of Wild Folk Farm in Benton, who have shown successfully that rice can be grown in Maine and that there is a strong market for it. Their original small experimental paddy was 2/3 of an acre but demand has outstripped supply and they are looking for new sites to help them expand their project. The grant that they received form Maine Technology Institute has allowed them the financial flexibility to do just this but they still need land!
"A good site for a paddy will have clay soil, an uphill pond with good capacity, a slight slope for water management and be identified in the United States Department of Agriculture’s plant hardiness map as in Zone 4b or warmer. For farmers who can and want to grow rice on their farms, Rooney and others from the Maine Rice Project will work with them to design and build paddy systems based on individual site characteristics. Some of the knowledge of how to build paddies on Maine farms came from his own years of trial and error at Wild Folk Farm, where rice growing began somewhat experimentally."
If you have land that meets the requirements of the project that you would be interested in leasing, get in touch with Ben by email at [email protected]
Bangor Daily News has recently published an article about the project, check it out here!

National Young Farmers Coalition - finding farmland flyer

National Young Farmers Coalition - Finding Farmland


Calling all new and aspiring farmers! Accessing farmland is one of the most complex financial decisions that any farmer will make. The National Young Farmers Coalition, along with Land for Good, Maine Farmland Trust and MOFGA are hosting a land access financials training for farmers next week in Unity ME. It's designed for aspiring and new career farmers who they want to help along their land access journey with confidence.
During the workshop you will learn about:

The workshop is completely free and refreshments will be provided. Click HERE to register.
If you cannot make the workshop, NYFC have also set up this really cool and useful website to assist farmers in finding land and figuring out the financials of doing so. 

scuffle hoe image

Image: An ode to the scuffle hoe


An Ode to the Scuffle Hoe
What weapon this?
In tool section A
I’d not known to miss
Your smoothly slicing foray
Through the barely there weeds
Conspiring today for the weeks coming hence
O! Not so! - those ignoble plants!
Your sharp ring with ease
Hardly turning the soil, so graceful your dance
And happ’ly no more is that threat’nd advance
So simple so sweet!
Scuffle hoe mine
Not once did I meet
a tool so humbly divine.
Without your wise counsel
I must surely admit
To many a day set bent o’er rows
Picking and pulling many an ounce
Losing my patience and wanting to quit
This project of feeding a few hungry maws
So thank you, yes, thank you
My dear scuffly friend.
But -
I’ve hustled and huffled past my wits’ bend...
And now I am thinking about going to a no-till, dense planting strategy with intensive cover cropping and mulch application. So I’m not really sure how much I’ll use you anymore. But thanks for all the help, you really saved my back from a lot of strain.

credit: Brett and Sue Coulstock


Permaculture is essentially a design philosophy created for and typically applied to food producing systems. However it has also been translated for use in many other areas such as architecture, community building, and corporate structures. Permaculture, developed by Bill Mollison in the late 1980s in Australia, has been adopted and adapted by gardeners, farmers, and designers across the world in the years since. Many permaculture solutions mimic natural ecosystems by creating tightly interwoven environments where all parts support each other. For example, in wild ecosystems, monocultures don’t exist as they do in our gardens and on our farms. Highly diverse planting, called a polyculture, serves several functions. These include slowing pests by making it more difficult to find the next plant of the variety they feed on. With varied crops in one bed, soil life can be in better balance. One plant may be nitrogen fixing to the benefit of its neighbors while another might provide a trellis or shade out competitive weeds. The three sisters planting strategy (or guild as it is called by permaculturists) is a simple example of the benefits derived from polycultures.
Complexity and diversity are pillars of permaculture, helping create a stable, healthy system. The more opportunities for interaction - between plants, insects, birds and animals, the better. We see this in a pond setting. More activity and life occurs at the edge of the pond where the water and land meet than in the middle of the pond or on the land a few yards away from the pond. The biodiversity found on ecological edges helps keep ecosystems stable. When one organism, say mosquitos, experiences a population boom, a diverse ecosystem supplies the habitat that mosquito predators will be able to live in. Thus the frogs and toads living on the banks of the pond can leap into action to bring the mosquito population back under control. The same is true on farms. Many of us already know the benefits of having strips of wildflowers planted near fields of cash crops. Similarly bramble-y edges that provide habitat for birds will be protection against a sudden attack by locusts or other pests.
Permaculture adopts the attitude that the benefits of a diverse system outweigh the losses in terms of harvesting efficiency and the space that is often called upon to be wild habitat. For many permaculturists, the increase in biodiversity and stability of their sites bring increases in crop health, yield, and pleasure. Permaculture systems require often heavy front end work in terms of observing the site and the pre-existing forces at play as well as establishing the backbone of the intended system (earth-moving, orchard establishment, etc.). Once the system is established, however, the permacultural model aims to shift the bulk of labor back to nature and off the shoulders of the farmer or gardener. Farmers Masanobu Fukoka and Sepp Holzer have been utilizing permaculture strategies since before the term existed. Their farms are prime examples of the impressive results permaculture strategies can yield in even inhospitable locations.
Many permaculturists advise that the best way to learn is to observe nature at work and to start trying things. If you’re interested in reading more, however, check out the following books:

This post was written by the newest member of the Greenhorns Blogging Team Cambria Whitcomb! Cambria is closing in on the end of her first official year of farming. She grew up in a rural town in Michigan and is a graduate of the University of Chicago. After a stint in San Francisco, she has returned to small town life - now in North Carolina where she pursues a plethora of environmentally-focused activities. She is interested in combining her background in the arts with her love of farming and the belief that systemic agricultural shifts make the most direct path to improving the environmental crisis. (How exactly those interests will mesh remains to be seen!) Cambria’s favorite farm implement is the scuffle hoe and she once incorporated cow manure into an assignment for a college art class.

Selling to Restaurants: A Farmer's Guide logo

Selling to Restaurants: A Farmer's Guide


"Connecting with chefs and restaurants can be intimidating, and it can be hard to figure out where to start. Restaurants can become some of your most reliable customers, placing predictable orders on a regular basis which can help you plan your season and give you a solid base to grow from. Beyond this, restaurants can introduce your farm to a wide audience who may be interested in direct sales as well, either via CSA shares, farmers markets, or through local retailers."
We came across this useful little 9 page guide written published by Local Food Marketplace recently. It gives hints and tips on how to establish relationships with local chefs, and find organisations who support local agriculture. It also offers practical marketing, promotion and business management advice. It's a fantastic resource for those looking to start selling and marketing their produce for direct sale for the first time ,or those who feel like they could do with a little help. It's also completely free. You can download it here.


Russ Finch is the ultimate grandaddy of Farm Hack . He designed a greenhouse in his backyard that is heated using geothermal energy. Despite the fact that winter temperatures in Nebraska can drop to -20°F, the retired mailman grows oranges, lemons, grapes, pomegranates and more without paying for heat. The setup he uses draws on the earth's stable temperature which is around 52 degrees in Nebraska to grow exotic fruit in the snow.
Finch first discovered the joys of geothermal heating while building his first house with his wife in 1979. Years later they decided to add a huge greenhouse in the backyard. The greenhouse is designed so that all components work together - the the foundation is 4ft deep and the roof is angled to catch the southern sun. The only energy input in the greenhouse is the fan used to pump the naturally warmed air around evenly.
Finch reckons that anybody can build a geothermal market producing greenhouse for about $25,000. Once the system is set up, it starts to pay for itself immediately due to the huge decrease in energy inputs. He sells a "Citrus in the Snow" report detailing his work with his "geo-air" greenhouses.


In March of this year, we along with our partners, sponsors and friends held the first FaithLands gathering hosted at Paicines Ranch in March 2018. Organized by a small group of dedicated faith and land access leaders, the gathering brought together 30 multi-faith participants from around the country working at the intersection of faith, ecological stewardship, and farming.
In planning for the gathering we came together and spoke about the great potential and needs for these groups to work together. We recognised that religious bodies hold a lot of legacy land and that this land can be used for creation in a way that benefits all members of a community. Tied into this hope was an acute awareness that this process needed to be nurtured.
Civil Eats published an article recently about faith lands. A number of the organisers and participants of the gathering and featured. They speak about the work that they are involved in and other work that is being done between farmers and churches across America. It's well worth a read! We are so proud to have been given the opportunity to be part of this gathering and are so excited to see what comes next!

"FaithLands attendees left with a list of commitments to pursue. The Greenhorns are creating a guide to working with local churches, and they’ll present on the topic at upcoming EcoFarm and Biodynamic Association conferences. Inspired by the New York City-based 596 Acres, a group of Catholics committed to mapping Catholic Church-owned land that might be suitable for sustainable agriculture, a steering committee coalesced to articulate the shared values and theological principles (across faith groups) that inform and inspire the FaithLands movement. And farmers like Moses Kashem will coach other beginning farmers on forming fruitful land partnerships with churches, especially when it comes to securing long-term leases."

Click HERE to read the full article.

As the interest in environmental sustainability continues to grow, many are curious as to how to reuse or re-imagine materials and substances that may be considered agricultural or construction waste. This interest may be partly fueled by pending shortages and rising input prices.
For example, insulation companies have developed alternative insulation materials from agricultural waste products. Additionally, researchers are looking for sustainable alternatives to concrete. A viable alternative to concrete derived from the root of mushrooms and fungi, along with other materials, may soon be worth considering. In fact, there are many ways in which agricultural and food waste can be remade and kept out of landfills.
Using sustainable alternatives often will potentially reduce the construction costs for materials. New home construction using agricultural waste materials is becoming more common. Sustainable materials are often appreciated by homeowners who may be looking to make their own homes environmentally friendly.

Using Agricultural Waste as Construction Material

Construction materials can be composed of many types of waste and be beneficial in resource management. There are predictions that use of organic waste materials can help reduce levels of waste. Building materials may be made up of waste from maize, potatoes and bananas.
The construction industry relies heavily on raw materials. Re-imagining the use of organic waste streams can offer lower-cost materials to the industry. There have been advances that can make it possible to create mushroom bricks and derive insulation from waste potatoes. Agricultural waste products that can be used within construction materials include:

These waste products are often discarded. It has been reported that food waste amounting to 60 million tons goes into landfills and could be used in the manufacturing of building materials.

Advanced Research and Comparisons Continue

According to one study, traditional concrete has been compared to self-compacting concrete made in part with agro-waste. This agro-waste concrete was composed of materials including tobacco waste, husk ash, cork, oyster shell and groundnut shell. This concrete mixture performed better in terms of workability compared to their counterparts. Such materials can be used as a fine aggregate replacement to as much as 20 percent.
When it came to mortar, adding bagasse ash appeared to increase resistance to chloride penetration and including cork resulted in improved cyclic performance and better thermal resistance. It appears that more research on the use of agro-waste continues on many different fronts.

Planning for a Sustainable Future with Agro-waste Construction Materials

The construction industry may be able to successfully deal with shortages in resources and increased prices for materials by looking at the potential of agro-waste construction products. Such products may offer practical solutions when it comes to long-lasting construction materials that are gentle on the environment and in some cases, such as with concrete, help reduce global carbon dioxide emissions when used as an alternative.
Everyone, from construction companies, agricultural interests, investors and homeowners should all be aware of sustainable agricultural waste products. These products, when used in various ways, construction being one, can not only help the environment, but potentially also the pocketbook.
This is a guest post by Gred Geilman President and CEO of South Bay Residential, manhattan beach CA 90266. Find him online, on twitter, on linkedIn, Facebook and Yelp

In February 2016, Greenhorns hosted a group of innovators in small-scale grains projects at Paicines Ranch, California for a first-of-its-kind convening.
We brought together these 40 farmers, millers, bakers and food activists for the purpose of discerning the trends and needs of the local grain movement. Our aim was to support relationship-building and networking amongst these pioneers. We also hoped to draw some conclusions about the next infrastructural developments and investments needed by this emerging regional grains economy.
The group represented a broad cross section of this burgeoning sector, all of whom participate in develop- ing the supply chain for a regional grain marketplace. Meanwhile, the majority of US produced, mainstream grains and beans are grown for anonymous commodity markets. Farms are often 2000 acres and larger because the crops are high-volume but low value that privilege vast acreages and expensive large scale machinery. These barriers are part of the reason staple crops are late to lo- cal markets. Another reason is that they require intermediate processing facilities such as mills and malt houses, which disappeared as farming and food handling consolidated during the early part of the 20th century.

History of grain production in the US

In the late 1800s and early 1900s, agricultural technology, from seeds to machinery, advanced and grain farming consolidated in grain belts around the country (like Idaho/ Washington, California, North Dakota, Kansas). By the 1950s and 1960s, the only milling happening at a local and small scale was for animal feed. Consolidation of grain processing has resulted in near monopoly control by Cargill etc.. who operate plants across the country. Everything from seed to market is preset for this dominant system.
Rebuilding regional, and regionally owned, grain production means creating new infrastructure, like community and on-farm mills, on-farm and regional storage and distribution channels, and developing seeds suited to locales, as well as local agricultural knowledge. Beyond these basics, professional bakers and brewers need training. These professionals are used to the uniformity of commodity products. They also need education on how to handle the variations that occur when growing and processing on a small scale. Simple logistics of getting regional staples to regional users are challenging, as storage and shipping facilities need reinvention, too. It takes quite a multi-dimensional team to steward these crops seed to loaf and ground to glass.
The people gathered at the ranch are at the forefront of a growing interest in traceable, sustainably produced staple crops. The report is a summary of the characteristics of these farm and food projects and the discussions that occurred at the meeting. It is a record of the challenges and opportunities that exist in the emerging regional grains market.
View the full report here: Greenhorns Small Grains Report


Greenhorns,
With summer in swing we can take up our scythes to launch summer workshop season. Join us in mid June for the first sessions, spread the word about the series of summer camps and workshops (including blueberry camp!) see schedule and rsvp asap to [email protected]
This month we are looking for artwork submissions for the much anticipated fourth volume of the New Farmers Almanac, reflecting on the success of the Faith Lands gathering and reminding you of our much anticipated summer line-up!

SEND US YOUR ARTWORK!


We’re seeking black & white photographs, sketches, illustrations, picture essays, maps, natural world paraphernalia, and other original art for the New Farmer’s Almanac, Vol IV. Glance at an overview of themes here, or email [email protected] ASAP with your ideas, questions, sample work, and/or links to your portfolio.

FAITH LANDS

Greenhorns and our sister organisation Agrarian Trust recently collaborated to hold the successful Faithlands conference in California. We would like to sincerely thank the Globetrotter Foundation for generously supporting and Paicines Ranch for graciously hosting.
“The main purpose of the gathering was to explore the potential for lands held by faith communities to be placed in the service of the sustainable agriculture movement and beginning farmers in particular. Many of us left this gathering, however, feeling that something much deeper and more far-reaching had occurred during our three days together.”
- Robert  Karp, former Executive Director and current Strategic Advisor to the Biodynamic Association
Click HERE to read Robert Karp’s full reflection on Faithlands
Following on from the success of the gathering, Greenhorns will again be joining in partnership with the Presbyterian Mission and many others to sponsor this years Food Week of Action from October 14th-21st. The themes for this years week of action are:
Claiming Rights:  Claim the right to food and freedom from want, and end racialized systems of oppression.
Fair Compensation:  Demand fair prices for farmers, fishers and other producers, no stolen wages, and fair wages for everyone.
Food Sovereignty:  Resist harmful practices and policies, and build just and sustainable local & regional food economies.
Click HERE to learn more about Food Week of Action 2018.

SUMMER SCHEDULE DOWNEAST

Our full line up can be found on our events calendar online HERE

JUNE:

June 10th: Greenhorns Presents: GPS for Beginners - ONLY 5 DAYS LEFT TO REGISTER!!

This workshop will go over the basics of making online digital maps of farm properties using a combination of handheld digital devices (GPS or smartphone) and online satellite and other imagery. We will discuss the most efficient ways to use and combine and manipulate these sources. We'll study additional data layers that can be added to a digital map such as information about elevation, slope and aspect (which direction a slope faces) as well as soil maps, tax maps and historical maps. We'll also review a few software packages that can assist in farm management and the process of importing our digital farm maps into their management environments. If time allows, we will go over the use of drones to build very high res maps of farm properties.
Our teacher is Markley Boyer. Markley has made maps for the Wildlife Conservation Society of a new national park system in Gabon, and mapped the historic ecosystems of Manhattan Island for the book Mannahatta.
Class size is limited, scholarships available. $40 to register: [email protected]

June 15th: Greenhorns and Scythe Supply present: One day short course in scything.

Taught by scything legend (and neighbour farmer) Jim Kovaleski and Carol Bryan of Scythe Supply. You will learn to manage fencerows, roads, paths, lawns, orchards – all without motor noise! Find the optimal physics, the romance of the swing, and learn some small tricks for sharpening and blade maintenance. (If you are coming from away, plan to arrive the evening of June 14th)
No purchase of Scythe is required, but all equipment will be available for sale. The daylong course costs $20 for downeasters/
$40 from away, and includes camping, picnic lunch, use of outdoor kitchen.Email [email protected] to register

June 16th - 17th: Greenhorns, Appleseed Permaculture and Owl + Bear Tree service present: Trail building theory and practice workshop

Join 3 experienced trail-makers as we cover theory, tools, practices and implementation in a very beautiful Maine forest. We’ll cover siting and planning, tool-use, wet-area materials, underbrush and trail-edge management. Reading slope, topography, landform– what does the land want? How can we design a sensuous slalom, with just enough intervention and design? We’ll do some wildlife trailing and tracking, noticing how animals use the landscape, where do they congregate, over-winter, nestle-down. How does this relate to our own goals, for hunting, for under-story herbalism, for siting our pathways across the forest?
$25 downeasters/$60 from away for the two day course, includes all meals. Email [email protected] to register

June 30th: Greenhorns and Maine Seaweed Exchange present: Wild + Cultivated algae: Seaweed Workshop #1

Join Sarah Redmond to learn more about the the relationship between humans and seaweed over the course of history and explore what comes next. This workshop will included presentations, introduction to marine biology, commons resource management methods and more!
Farm lunch provided $200/Scholarships available. Email [email protected] to register.

JULY:


July 21st - 22nd: Friends of Liberty Hall and Greenhorns present: “Halls away Downeast” - A bus-tour of historic halls from Ellsworth to Eastport, Maine

AUGUST:

All of August: Greenhorns Presents: Blueberry Camp!
August 5th: Greenhorns Presents: Blueberry Wine Workshop
August 17th - 25th: Greenhorns Presents: Sail Training Camp - Downeast Foxfire with Arista Holden

SEPTEMBER:

September 7th - 9th: Greenhorns Present and Eat Local Eastport Present: Edible Wild Plants and Mushrooms in the Maine Woodlands and Wildlands - with Russ Cohen and Peter McCoy

OCTOBER:

October 13th: Greenhorns Presents: Wild fruit vinega! Making apple cider vinegar on a homestead scale.
Registration required for all classes and workshops, email [email protected] ASAP to register.

Dangerously high levels of lead in Pittsburgh's drinking water

It has recently emerged that a lack of corrosion control in the water system in Pittsburgh has caused dangerously high levels of lead in the city's drinking water. According to Dr. Marc Edwards, levels recorded in Pittsburgh are even higher than the levels recorded in Flint MI in 2015. A lack of corrosion control was the physical issue in Flint, as it is in Pittsburg. However, that the level of lead was allowed to get to such levels shows an utter disregard for the wellbeing of those affected. Government and private actors tasked to serve the people and provide basic and essential services have failed.
It is not surprising to learn that the private company behind the lead crisis in Flint, is behind the current situation in Pittsburgh. Vieola is the worlds largest private supplier of water services.

Unaccountable

The cities of both Flint and Pittsburgh have taken legal action against Vieola. Charges in flint include: “professional negligence and fraud. These actions caused Flint’s lead poisoning problem to continue and worsen, and created an ongoing public nuisance”. In Pittsburgh, the Water and Sewer Authority sued Vieola in 2016 for the sum of $12.5 million. Charges against Vieola include: gross mismanagement of PWSA’s operations, abuse of it's position of trust and confidence, and misleading and deceiving PWSA.
Despite legal proceedings, Vieola has so far been able to avoid responsibility. In Pittsburgh both the city and Vieola are trying to pass the blame onto each other. Neither party is taking responsibility for poisoning those who they should be accountable to. After an extensive arbitration process Vieola and the city authority issued a joint statement . It said that neither party "admits or concedes any allegations or claims made"
In an era of increasing water scarcity and rapid urban growth, privatization of water services and resources is a global threat. Privitization can seriously undermine the democratic control and power of the people and the structures of the state. Recent events have shown that water privitization also puts the people at risk of being held hostage by unaccountable mega-corporations who have a monopoly on our most precious resource - water.
Read more in the Intercept HERE.


There are less than two weeks to go before we kick off our jam packed summer events schedule in Downeast costal Maine! First up on June 10th is GPS for Beginners, led by Markley Boyer. This workshop will be particularly useful for agrarians, young and old who are looking to more efficiently use their land, as well as those interested in cartography and topography.
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Faith Gilbert has just released her Guide to Sharing Farm Equipment, a 42-page guidebook intended for farmers, service providers, cooperators, and organizers of shared equipment pools. The guidebook covers a wide array of practical concerns for equipment sharing. It includes case studies, a review of ownership and management arrangements, financial considerations, annotated budgets, best practices, as well as much more to facilitate tool-sharing initiatives. It's available for free online HERE and print copies are available by request from Letterbox Farm.


The Coffelt Farm is an historic, diversified farm situated on 185 acres in pastoral Crow Valley. Farm operations include a certified raw milk dairy, a market garden, orchards, and a livestock operation which includes cattle, sheep, hogs, and poultry.

Here are the farmhand position details:
Duties and Responsibilities
Personal Qualifications
Compensation

Click HERE to visit their website and please contact Sara Joy at: [email protected] to apply.

credit: bicimakina


 
You may be familiar with Farm Hack, started by Greenhorns founder Severine. Farm Hack is a worldwide community of farmers that build and modify their own tools (including a few bicycle based tools like the bike tractor). But have you heard about Bicimakina? Bicimakina is a community of makers, educators, and enthusiasts all joined by a common love of human-powered machines. Pedal-powered blenders and hand-cranked grain mills are just a few of the awesome machines that these guys have come up with. Their mission is to create a renaissance of interest and exploration into human-powered technology.
This fall, the Bicimakina team are leaving Oregon and heading across the US on an epic bike trip to find and interview other like-minded Human-Powered Machine users and builders. If you are one of these minded people get in touch with them and tell them about your project and they might just come to you! Their trip will take a year, and their exact route will be determined by the locations of the people who are going to be on the show but their goal is to do a full loop across the US.
Check out their website HERE


Hark the peeps!
Sniff the earth!
SHE IS HERE!
In this edition:

Summer Schedule

As you know Greenhorns has recently moved our headquarters to ‘Reversing Hall’ , an old Odd Fellows Hall in Pembroke, Downeast Maine. To celebrate and showcase our beautiful and historic HQ we will be hosting an array of summer workshops and camps that support the entry of young people into sustainable agriculture in Pembroke this summer.

June:
GPS for Beginners  June 10th

 
Our teacher is Markley Boyer, conservationist and adventurer and we will be learning how to use digital mapping, remote sensing, large-scale print-outs and plain old drafting paper to create working farm management plans. We’ll use great software to access different layers of information (soils, tax maps, etc). The resulting maps/farm plans can be used for grazing management, organic certification, trail-making, agroforestry, monitoring seaweed harvests and other aquatic users, and includes multi-layered data about weather, wildlife and other phenomenology.
We will work with a variety of tools, comparing best uses. From Open Source: Farmier, Gaia Maps, Pasturemap, Prospect, maybe even a tiny bit of google maps. We have a few lender-laptops for those who need, if you have a laptop please bring it. Class size is limited, scholarships available. $40 to register: [email protected]

One day short-course in Scything: June 15th

Taught by scything legend (and neighbor farmer) Jim Kovaleski and Carol Bryan of Scythe Supply. You will learn to manage fencerows, roads, paths, lawns, orchards – all without motor noise! Find the optimal physics, the romance of the swing, and learn some small tricks for sharpening and blade maintenance. (If you are coming from away, plan to arrive the evening of June 14th)
No purchase of Scythe is required, but all equipment will be available for sale. The daylong course costs $20 for downeasters/$40 from away, and includes camping, picnic lunch, use of outdoor kitchen.

Trail building theory and practice workshop: June 16th & 17th

Hosted by:
– Brannan Buehner of Owl and Bear Tree services,
– Connor Stedman of Appleseed Permaculture,
– Deirdre Whitehead, Maine Coast Heritage Trust land steward
All animals and all empires understand the power of the trail – but do you? We’ll cover siting and planning, tool-use, wet-area materials, underbrush and trail-edge management. Reading slope, topography, landform– what does the land want? How can we design a sensuous slalom, with just enough intervention and design? We’ll do some wildlife trailing and tracking, noticing how animals use the landscape, where do they congregate, over-winter, nestle-down. How does this relate to our own goals, for hunting, for under-story herbalism, for siting our pathways across the forest?
Join 3 experienced trail-makers as we cover theory, tools, practices and implementation in a very beautiful Maine forest. We’ll create some trail earthworks (swales, drainages, water-bars, brush-piles and brush-gabions) that prevent erosive decline of the trail-way, and discuss remediation for old lumber roads. The techniques of trail-making can build skills relevant on self-willed as well as domesticated landscapes, today’s meadows are yesterday’s woodlands. From here, we can begin drawing the forest-habitat back out into the meadows with agroforestry planning. YES! We will actually make trails through a beautiful forest on a salt-water farm in Downeast Maine and you will gain serious confidence to make better trails in whatever forested landscapes you call home. (June 15 afternoon/evening arrival)
$25 downeasters/$60 from away for the two day course, includes all meals. Scholarships available, email: [email protected]

Wild and Cultivated Algae: Seaweed workshop #1: June 23rd

This will include a full day session with Sarah Redmond and special guest teachers which will feature:

Farm lunch provided $200/Scholarships available. Email [email protected] to RSVP

July

- July 21st - 22nd: "Halls away Downeast" - A bus-your of historic halls from Ellsworth to Eastport, Maine.

August

- All of August: Blueberry Camp!
- August 5th: Blueberry Wine Workshop
- August 17th - 25th: Sail Training Camp - Downeast Foxfire with Arista Holden

September

- September 7th - 9th: Edible Wild Plants and Mushrooms in the Maine Woodlands and Wildlands - with Russ Cohen and Peter McCoy

October

- October 13th: Wild fruit vinega! Making apple cider vinegar on a homestead scale.
Emma made a nice calendar online where you can view the full line up.
We've also got a few hovering workshops on natural beekeeping, oystering and another one on seaweed ecology...so stay tuned! We will be posting them on social media and the online calendar.

Sources of hopeful and useful news

Given the state of the world, we are finding that without some effort we fall into a NYTime/NPR/Guardian votex of headline -in the time that could be spend on personal research and inquiry on topics relevant to intervention. Therefore we have been taking the effort to catelog alternative sources of new and learning which can occupy the 'news curiosity' in a more uplifting and fulfillling manner You get the drift?
Global Sisters Report - news from nuns around the world.
Reveal - a podcast from the Centre for Investigative Reporting.
Down to Earth - a podcast from Quivira Coalition
The new food economy - a slightly bitchy new online food and farm news source, we love them!

Here is a list of others that you should check out too!

Purple Pitchfork
Heritage Radio Network
Farmer to Farmer Podcasts
Permaculture Voices
Farmstead Meatsmiths
Ileia magazine
The Ruminant
Radio Cate/ Down to Earth
NextEconomyNow Podcast
Delicious Revolution Podcast
The Daily Yonder
Civil Eats
Ag Insider
Tilth Online
Perennial Plate videos
Rural in These Times newspaper
Rural Roots Film Festival
Farmerama Podcast

Engagement Opportunities

Sought: EXPERIENCED and EXCELLENT volunteer proofreader/final editor for the forthcoming Greenhorns guide to Food Logistics. You will work in partnership with Claire and Leah the authors, to bring to final perfection our new guidebooks as we head into layout and art production. It says volunteer, but we'd be very willing to barter you a free tipi-weekend with blueberries and boating for your family. Email [email protected]
Sought: Part-time Spring/Summer Greenhorns! We're looking for a few good part time residential workers to help with establishing our summer camp infrastructure, cataloging the library, preparing the hall for the new office and our summer programs. We can also help you find other local work around here in Downeast Maine...there are wonderful local organic businesses to chose from. Get in touch now! with your resume and cover letter. Early birds et their first choice of bay-view tend platform. We are looking for motivated, happy, helpful and kind-spirited Greenhorns for our new home, we had such delightful winter helpers..and now the sun is shining and the air is warm! Email [email protected]
Sought: micro-part-time Greenhorns bloggers, please get in touch with [email protected], blog maven about contributing to our beloved blog. Usually it's a 1-2 hour a week commitment and gives you a chance to peer into an amazing trove of news items!
Looking forward to a very busy summer!
Thanks to our crew,
Soraya Farivar - Former intern, current Greenhorn
Ethan Bien - OurLand
Arista Holden - Downeast Fox Fire Sail Camp
Briana Olson - Almanac Editor
Katie Eberle - Almanac Design
Leah Cook & Claire Cekander -  Greenhorns Guide to Food Logistics
Emma O'Leary - Administrative Director
Ian McSweeney - Treasurer
Severine Fleming - Director
Donate to help the Greenhorns continue with our important work. Please click here and feel happy that your support is shared (8%) with our new fiscal sponsor MOFGA (Maine Farmers and Gardeners Association)


You may remember our previous post about The Maine Rice Project. Their goal is to get as many farmers and folks  as possible eating and growing rice throughout Maine, the Maritimes, and the Northeast. They recently received a grant from Maine Technology Institute to expand their rice growing operation and are looking for help finding new sites to expand to.
For the past five years the project has been based out of Wild Folk Farm in Benton. During that time the Ben and Asher  have successfully shown that rice can be grown in Maine, and that there is a market for it. They have expanded from one small experimental rice paddy, to 2/3 of an acre in rice paddy cultivation, producing 3,000 pounds of rice annually and have learned a lot along the way. Right now demand for their rice is surpassing what they can supply at our farm (how awesome is that!).
This summer the search is on for new locations in the state of Maine on which to build a bigger, better rice paddy system. They are looking to partner with existing farms interested in incorporating rice paddies into their farm operations and/or leasing land to grow rice. The rice paddy system they are planning to build will be in the range of 1-4 acres, and site work is expected to begin spring of 2019.
Paddy systems will be built and designed based on individual site characteristics, working with farm owners to ensure designs integrate well into their current operations. One of the advantages of growing rice in Maine is that rice paddies work best in poorly drained, clay rich soil which do not typically suit growing vegetables and other crops. There is plenty of this kind of soil in Maine.
A good rice paddy site will need to have the following basic characteristics:
1) Clay Soil
2) Uphill pond with good capacity, or place to dig one
3)  slight slope for water management
4) Zone 4b or warmer
For more information visit: wildfolkfarm.com or email: [email protected]

https://www.flickr.com/photos/usdagov/16058392545
Yesterday, the House Ag Committee released their first draft of the next farm bill, which when passed will be in place until 2023. 
The process required for the farm bill to pass is as follows:
1. The House Ag Committee releases their draft.
2. The committee meets for "markup," when they suggest and vote on amendments - This is scheduled for next Wednesday,
3. The amended draft goes to the House floor to be voted on. At this stage, any member can introduce an amendment which will then be voted on. Once this process is completed the House will vote to pass a revised version of the farm bill.
4. After the House stage, a similar process will be followed in the Senate.
5. The final stages of passing a bill into law include the conference committee before the final vote.

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Rachel Alexandrou has been a regular contributor to Greenhorns New Farmers Almanac over the years. Her stunning work will be shown in a solo art show on April 13th in Portland Maine at Oxbow Brewery's Gallery 49. Rachel's current work focuses on concepts of decay, plant matter and herbarium specimens. 20% of the proceeds of the show will be kindly donated by Rachel to two land trust in the area, the Damariscotta River Association and Midcoast Conservancy.
Please support this wonderful artist and the equally wonderful cause that she has chosen.

Maine Governor LePage

This message is sent on behalf of Tim Glidden, President at Maine Coast Heritage Trust. 

Dear Maine Land Trusts,
Last night, Governor LePage delivered his final State of the State address. As we expected, right out of the gate he blamed land trusts for Maine's rising property taxes. He relied upon many statistics to make his case. Unfortunately, much of what he said was inaccurate and out of context.

What's Missing?

The Governor's comments continue to ignore the many benefits of conservation land to Maine people and our state's economy. These land trust conserved lands include more than 2.1 million acres of productive forestland, 36,000 acres of active farmland, and more than 60 access sites for commercial fisherman. Land trusts also provide public access to sportsmen on more than 90% of all their conserved lands and thousands of miles of trails for hiking, skiing, mountain biking, ATV riding, and snowmobiling.
In addition, contrary to the Governor's depiction, land trusts are working in partnership with municipalities, community leaders, and businesses all around the state to complete conservation projects to improve the lives of Maine people and visitors. This is why land conservation and efforts like the Land for Maine's Future program continue to enjoy should broad, bipartisan support.

Big Misstatement

The Governor's speech included the wild assertion that land trusts are responsible for removing more than $18 billion of land off the municipal tax rolls, resulting in a loss of more than $330 million in property taxes. To the contrary, the $18 billion and $330 million figures he referenced include all tax exempt real estate (land and buildings) owned by the Federal Government, the State of Maine, municipalities, quasi-municipal organizations, churches, and other nonprofits. We estimate the land trust component of this figure to be less than 1% of the total.
For more information and additional statistics about Maine land trusts and their lands, view the report HERE.

What you can do to help

MCHT anticipates that the Governor will be submitting legislation over the next month targeting land trust tax exemption eligibility.
Over the past few weeks, many of you have stepped up to submit opinion pieces to your local newspaper to tell the real story of land conservation in Maine. These have been very helpful. If you have not had a chance to submit something to your local newspaper, it is not too late.
Stay tuned for future updates on this issue. MCHT is working on additional communications strategies and will share with you the legislation once it becomes official.
Click HERE to watch the full speech (the land trust section begins around the 12-minute mark). Alternatively, you can also read a full transcript HERE


The Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association (MOFGA) -fiscal sponsor of the Greenhorns - has launched a search for its next Executive Director. MOFGA's Board of Directors seeks a dynamic leader and proven manager who shares the organization's passion for organic agriculture, local food production, a healthy environment, and thriving Maine communities.

Background and Overview

Formed in 1971, Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association is the oldest and largest state organic organization in the country. MOFGA takes pride in its success in promoting and supporting Maine farmers and a multi-generational agricultural community and has been at the heart of changing Maine’s farm culture. MOFGA’s efforts have resulted in dramatically increasing the popularity of organic local agriculture and healthy living, and its organizational successes and impact have resulted in national and international recognition.
When asked to describe MOFGA, the first response is almost always: “It’s a community.” Today that community includes more than 6,200 memberships, with over 11,000 members, a volunteer corps of more than 2,500, a 20 member board of directors, and a staff of 34. This community is best symbolized by its signature community gathering: the Common Ground Country Fair, which annually attracts more than 63,000 visitors during one weekend in September.
The core work of MOFGA is educating people about how to grow, prepare, and share good organic food. MOFGA’s organic certification program annually reviews the practices of over 500 farms and food processors to help assure the public that food labeled as "certified organic" has been grown according to nationally accepted organic standards. Today, as a result of MOFGA’s support for, and partnership with, farmers in Maine, more than 95,000 acres of farmland in the state is MOFGA certified organic. MOFGA works to grow the market for local organic products and strengthen the economic viability of MOFGA certified producers and local communities.
A more comprehensive description of MOFGA and its many programs and services can be found on the website.
Guided by a recently completed strategic plan, the Executive Director will work with the Board of Directors, MOFGA volunteers and partners, and a talented and experienced staff to lead and grow the organic movement in Maine. MOFGA’s Board is seeking an energetic and trusted leader who can build and nurture essential relationships throughout Maine—a leader who can embrace MOFGA’s culture, honor its grassroots history, and support a highly regarded staff team to achieve ambitious goals for the future.

Organizational priorities to guide the next Executive Director

• Build relationships and strengthen bonds with our members, volunteers and donors, across the state of Maine, while working with the board, staff, and committees to advance the goals of deepening member engagement and building the diversity of our membership.
• Guide and support communication efforts to promote the Maine organic brand, to expand markets for organic products, and bring heightened visibility and recognition to MOFGA.
• Play an active and visible role in ensuring MOFGA’s financial well-being and sustainability while taking a leadership role in annual and capital fundraising efforts.
• Support the staff team, taking steps to empower them in their work, build their capacity, and ensure they have the organizational, technological, and physical infrastructure in place to be successful.
• Partner with the board and staff to advance the strategic plan, bring rigor to the tracking and evaluation of performance, and support the ongoing development of board governance practices.
• Represent MOFGA in Augusta and in Washington D.C, advocating for organic integrity, small farmers, and a healthy, sustainable environment.

Position Requirements

To lead MOFGA requires a comprehensive set of skills and abilities. We expect that the successful candidate
will bring the following to MOFGA:
• A passion for our values, our mission, agriculture and the environment
• A “curious mind” and a hunger for learning
• Senior-level leadership experience, including proven ability to manage and support staff and volunteer teams
• Solid writing skills, comfort in public speaking, and being regarded by all as a “good listener”
• A proven “relationship builder” who can also demonstrate hands-on experience with and a readiness to engage in fundraising
• The highest level of recommendations from references, collaborative partners, and peers

In addition to the expectations listed above, preference will be given to candidates who can also
demonstrate the following:

• A deep appreciation for the value and impact of volunteers and a track-record of successfully working with volunteers to achieve shared goals
• Demonstrated ability in developing organizational strategies and carrying them through to completion
• Nonprofit experience, including working in a healthy and productive partnership with a board of directors
• A global vision coupled with relevant policy and advocacy knowledge and experience at the state and federal level
• Hands-on experience with, and or a deep knowledge of, farming, growing, organic practices, and the realities of rural living
• Ability to engage with our varied and diverse community and develop and nurture essential relationships

Compensation

Comprehensive benefits package and competitive salary commensurate with experience.
This position reports directly to the Board of Directors. The successful candidate can expect a formal review after six months as well as an annual review.

To Apply

Interested candidates should submit a cover letter and résumé to Starboard Leadership Consulting at the
following address [email protected]. The cover letter and résumé should contain detailed
information concerning work experience, past successes, leadership experience and qualifications. Please
be prepared to provide contact information for professional references upon request.
Paper copies may be sent to
Lisa Belyea, Starboard Leadership Consulting,
84 Harlow St.,
Bangor, ME 04401,
Electronic submission of materials is preferred.
No phone inquiries, please.
Review of applications will begin on March 28, 2018.
MOFGA also has job openings in expanding program and administration areas. Currently posted positions include: Organic Crops and Conservation Specialist; Low Impact Forestry Coordinator; and Development Coordinator.

The view from the porch!


A wonderful and cozy home in Pembroke, Maine is available to rent for a number of weeks during the Summer of 2018. If you are hoping to attend one of our exciting upcoming events or just want to soak up the atmosphere in Downeast Maine and explore the new home of the Greenhorns this is the perfect place to stay.
These are the dates that are still available (as of 2.23.18).

- May 19th-26th
- May 26th - June 2nd
- June 2nd - 9th
- July 7th - 14th
- July 14th - 21st
- July 21st - 28th (especially relevant to anybody attending“Halls away Downeast” – A bus-tour of historic halls from Ellsworth to Eastport, Maine which takes place on July 21st and 22nd!)
- July 28th - August 2nd
The restored 1840s homestead has 450 feet of frontage on the Pennamaquan Estuary of Cobscook Bay, 10 acres of open fields, and over 40 acres of forest that include a well-marked set of hiking trails. The house is also fully equipped and can sleep eight to ten persons. Finally, the homestead is situated on the Leighton Point Road between The Reversing Hall (Greenhorns HQ) and Smithereen Farm.
For more information and photographs please contact Catherine Adelman at: [email protected]

Credit: Soul Fire Farm

Check out this awesome article written by very good friend of the Greenhorns, Jean Willoughby for Yes! Magazine. Jean writes about the recent changes within the farming movement. Her article focuses on the increase in the number of voluntary transfers of land and resources to people of color as a means of reparations for past injustices.

"Last month, Dallas Robinson received an email from someone she didn’t know, asking if she would be open to receiving a large sum of money—with no strings attached. For once, it wasn’t spam. She hit reply.
Robinson is a beginning farmer with experience in organic agriculture, and has had plans to establish the Harriet Tubman Freedom Farm on 10 acres of family land near her home in Rocky Mount, North Carolina. Located in an area where the poverty rate hovers at nearly 20 percent, according to census data, and where both food insecurity and obesity rates are even higher, the farm will focus on serving the needs of the surrounding community by producing vegetables, herbs, and mushrooms.
The gift from the stranger arrived thanks to a new online map, the Black-Indigenous Farmers Reparations Map, a project to promote “people-to-people” reparations."

The email that Robinson received was from Douglass DeCandia (regular contributor to the Greenhorns New Farmers Almanac!) who had heard Robinson speak at the young farmers conference this year which featured the controversial speech from keynote Mark Bittman. Bittman's response to those speaking truth to power at the conference was a stark awakening for many and has encouraged many of those who hold power to question how they are holding themselves accountable.

Click HERE to read the full article.

Greenhorns, has just turned 10, and has moved to Pembroke ME. Here, we will continue our publishing and cultural work for a national audience, as well as developing locally-oriented educational events including a ‘naturalist adventure’ summer camp series that supports the entry of young people into sustainable agriculture. Come from near, come from far - scholarships available.

We will house our offices and 8,000 volume agricultural library in the beautifully wood-panelled Odd Fellows Hall, built by the George Washington Lodge of Odd Fellows in 1896, which we have re-christened the ‘Reversing Hall’ after the Reversing Falls, which gave the Passamaquoddy name to Cobscook Bay. The Hall is protected by a Maine Preservation easement - we will seek grants to restore the hall. Our headquarters will also house the equipment of cultural production - our painting, fabric and props studio, our tool-shop, radio podcast and audio-visual editing equipment. We look forward to local, regional and intergalactic collaborations and collaborators, beginning with a workshop series in 2018.

Here is the Schedule for 2018 so far!

FEBRUARY

February 25th 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Cobscook Community Learning Centre, MOFGA and C.J Walke Present:
Pruning Demonstration
At the Cobscook Community Learning Centre
The first part of the The 7th Pruning and Downeast Scionwood Exchange/Grafting Demonstration Events features a pruning demonstration with C.J Walke from MOFGA. C.J. began working for MOFGA in 2006 as Landscape Coordinator for the Common Ground Education Center in Unity, and has held various roles within the organization since then. In his part-time role as Orchard Educator, C.J. works with farmers and gardeners to build orchard health and promote biological diversity among fruit trees.
Pruning requires only a few tools, and the techniques are simple and fun to learn. If you are already an experienced grafter or orchardist, please come and share your knowledge with the group. The workshop will begin indoors with some basic information about pruning as well as information tailored to meet the interests of the group. The remainder of the day will be spent outdoors working on several trees on site to get some hands-on experience with pruning.
Register online HERE
-----------
MARCH
March 18th 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Cobscook Community Learning Centre, MOFGA and C.J. Walke present:
Downeast Scionwood Exchange and Grafting Demonstration.
At the Cobscook Community Learning Centre.

Grafting is the uniting of two different tree or shrub varieties or stocks together in order to create a more desirable fruit. All named apples, such as Gala (a fairly new variety) and Wolf River (a variety from Wisconsin developed around 1875), were developed through grafting. In Maine, grafting is done later in the spring – April to May - when the tree's sap run is more established. At the Scionwood Exchange, you will be, also doing bench grafting which is done on rootstock indoors and then planted out later in the spring. Rootstock will be provided.
Please bring scion wood from your favorite trees to share with others and dress appropriately to be outside. For more information about when and how to collect scionwood, click here
Click HERE to register online.
-----------

JUNE

June 10th, 2018
Greenhorns presents:
GPS for Beginners.
At Reversing Hall, Pembroke, Maine

Our teacher is Markley Boyer, conservationist and adventurer and we will be learning how to use digital mapping, remote sensing, large-scale print-outs and plain old drafting paper to create working farm management plans. We’ll use great software to access different layers of information (soils, tax maps, etc). The resulting maps/farm plans can be used for grazing management, organic certification, trail-making, agroforestry, monitoring seaweed harvests and other aquatic users, and includes multi-layered data about weather, wildlife and other phenomenology.

We will work with a variety of tools, comparing best uses. From Open Source: Farmier, Gaiamaps, Pasturemap, Prospect, maybe even a tiny bit of googlemaps. We have a few lender-laptops for those who need, if you have a laptop please bring it. Class size is limited, scholarships available. $40 to register: [email protected]

-----------

June 15th, 2018
Greenhorns and Scythe Supply present:
One day short-course in Scything
At Smithereen Farm

Taught by scything legend (and neighbor farmer) Jim Kovaleski and Carol Bryan of Scythe Supply. You will learn to manage fencerows, roads, paths, lawns, orchards - all without motor noise! Find the optimal physics, the romance of the swing, and learn some small tricks for sharpening and blade maintenance. (If you are coming from away, plan to arrive the evening of June 14th)

No purchase of Scythe is required, but all equipment will be available for sale. The daylong course costs $100 and includes camping, picnic lunch, use of outdoor kitchen.

-----------

June 16th - 17th, 2018
Greenhorns, Appleseed Permaculture and Owl + Bear Tree service presents:
Trail building theory and practice workshop
with:

Brannan Buehner of Owl and Bear Tree services,
Connor Stedman of Appleseed Permaculture,
Deirdre Whitehead, Maine Coast Heritage Trust land steward

All animals and all empires understand the power of the trail - but do you? We’ll cover siting and planning, tool-use, wet-area materials, underbrush and trail-edge management. Reading slope, topography, landform-- what does the land want? How can we design a sensuous slalom, with just enough intervention and design? We’ll do some wildlife trailing and tracking, noticing how animals use the landscape, where do they congregate, over-winter, nestle-down. How does this relate to our own goals, for hunting, for under-story herbalism, for siting our pathways across the forest?
Join 3 experienced trail-makers as we cover theory, tools, practices and implementation in a very beautiful Maine forest. We’ll create some trail earthworks (swales, drainages, water-bars, brush-piles and brush-gabions) that prevent erosive decline of the trail-way, and discuss remediation for old lumber roads. The techniques of trail-making can build skills relevant on self-willed as well as domesticated landscapes, today’s meadows are yesterday’s woodlands. From here, we can begin drawing the forest-habitat back out into the meadows with agroforestry planning. YES! We will actually make trails through a beautiful forest on a salt-water farm in Downeast Maine and you will gain serious confidence to make better trails in whatever forested landscapes you call home. (June 15 afternoon/evening arrival)
$250 for the two day course, includes all meals. Scholarships available, email: [email protected]
If you want to do this cool Sea Kayaking course we heard about, that could be fun too - as a combo  It takes place from June 9-16, 2018.

-----------

June 23th
Greenhorns and Maine Seaweed Exchange present:
Wild + Cultivated algae: Seaweed Workshop #1

This will include:

- A full day session with Sarah Redmond and special guest teachers which will feature:
- Presentations and Slideshows at the Reversing Hall, field study on the shore.
- Orientation to the Inter-tidal, marine biology
- Introduction to wildcrafting and farming edible seaweeds
- Look at the history of seaweed aquaculture around the world.
- Looking at the potential for seaweed aquaculture in Maine: opportunities and risks
- Introduction to the work of Elinor Ostrom on the Commons, and principles of community resource management
- Introduction to species, ecology, ethics, equipment, siting considerations, seasonality, harvest, processing.
- We’ll discuss bio-safety protocols, look at seaweed health and disease management strategies.
- We will talk about local economy, political ecology and learning our lessons from fisheries history in Maine.
- We’ll discuss what kind of policy is needed create a Maine seaweed sector inviting to young, conservation-minded mariculturists
- We’ll evaluate wild and cultivated products, discuss best practices and market potential
- We will have plenty of time for discussion.

Farm lunch provided $200/Scholarships available [email protected] to RSVP

-----------

JULY

July 21-22
Friends of Liberty Hall and Greenhorns present:
“Halls away Downeast” - A bus-tour of historic halls from Ellsworth to Eastport, Maine

This course is perfect for people over 60 years old, no strenuous physical activity required!

Includes all meals, transportation, lectures and accommodations for a 2 day whistle-stop tour including wonderful guest lecturers, farm visits and adventures in historic preservation. This is a program coordinated in partnership with Friends of Liberty Hall, Machiasport, ME, Maine Preservation and Greenhorns - a young farmers group which recently moved to an Odd Fellows Hall in Washington County.

Meet 8 am at the historical society Northeast Harbor or mid morning in Ellsworth, hall to hall (Ruggles House, Cherryfield Historic District, Liberty Hall, Reversing Hall, a couple Granges and fantastic churches too.) Come explore the civic architecture of Washington County, and some of the projects and programs animating these spaces. Attend wonderful lectures and events, sleep overnight on a beautiful saltwater farm, more halls and lectures and return the next afternoon ($350 tax-deductible donation requested)
To sign up, email [email protected]

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AUGUST

August 5th
Greenhorns and Jim Cornish Present:
Blueberry Wine Workshop

Join us on August 5th from noon until 4:00 pm for our Blueberry Wine making workshop with Jim Cornish. Participants are required to bring 15 pounds of blueberries and a potato masher the day of the workshop in addition to 12 pounds of sugar five teaspoons of lemon juice and five teaspoons of yeast to add on the third day after the workshop. The wine yield will be approx. 5 1/2 gallons. After the workshop spend an evening with Jim listening to and singing along to live Folk and Americana music that we all know and love sprinkled with a few original songs.
This workshop costs $50, which includes step by step instructions, a fermenting bucket, an air lock and a corker. Email [email protected] to RSVP.
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August 17th - 26th, 2018
Greenhorns Presents:
Sail Training Camp: Downeast Foxfire with Arista Holden

Greenhorns is pleased to present our first sail training program, a follow up on Maine Sail Freight project, which brought us to Maine! Starting at Liberty Hall in Machiasport and visiting islands, coves, and historic sites while immersing students in the wild coastal ecology of Downeast Maine, this ten day course offers a birch bark crafting workshop, traditional seamanship training and all sorts of naturalist adventure. Yes, you will learn to row and sail aboard the 18th-century Bantry Bay gigs.

Here is sign up spot: https://www.atlanticchallengeusa.com/downeast-foxfire-camp.html
For details talk to [email protected], $450 for 10 days, scholarships available.
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All of August, 2017

Blueberry camp!  Arrange to camp at Smithereen Farm to harvest your own blueberries and make your own jam in our beautiful new timber-frame kitchen. DIY Blueberry Commons. Bring your own tent, jars and sugar, come explore the beautiful Cobscook Region on a low impact family holiday! You can enjoy the Greenhorns Agricultural Library and our little improvised tourist office at the 1901 Odd Fellows Hall, go hiking, biking, kayaking, exploring New Brunswick and etc! I made a little tourist page on the website: www.smithereenfarm.com
—> Buy your provisions locally at Whole Life Machias, Machias Marketplace, Eat Local Eastport, Lubec and Eastport Farmers Markets and at the Tide Mill Farm farm stand! Washington County is far away, but this landscape is wealthy in wild foods, and utterly worth the trip up. “Drive like a champ, eat like a king.”
$50/ night includes, tent platform, use of the timber-frame kitchen+ stove, composting toilet + hot shower bathhouse, and all-access to the blueberry commons. For Bookings contact [email protected]

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SEPTEMBER

September 7th - 9th
Greenhorns and Eat Local Eastport present:
Shiitake + Chaga Focused: Forest Mycology in the Maine Woodlands And Wildlands
Taught by Radical Mycology author and educator Peter McCoy and Russ Cohen, naturalist, seed-saver, wildcrafting educator.

MUSHROOMS! Besides logging, how can we interact with woodlands in ways that sustain us? MUSHROOMS! This homesteader-oriented program looks at mycological practices and practical considerations for tending the wild, managing the forest commons for multiple human uses as well as for animal + insect users. Downeast Maine is home to over sixty species of edible wild plants, some of which are more nutritious and/or flavorful than their cultivated counterparts. Join Russ Cohen (invited), wild foods enthusiast and author of the book Wild Plants I Have Known…and Eaten, to explore several Downeast properties and varied habitats to encounter at least two dozen species of edible wild plants. Keys to the identification of each species will be provided, along with info on edible portion(s), season(s) of availability and preparation methods, as well as guidelines on safe and environmentally responsible foraging.

Topics include:
- Wild harvest ethics, discussion of Chaga - life cycle, tincturing and value added.
- Learning about lichens, for natural dye and medicine.
- Using mushrooms to read the forest health.

We’ll have a major focus on Shiitake! The thousand-year old Japanese tradition of growing mushroom logs outdoors in the woods including site selection, methods and doing it ourselves. You’ll learn hands-on how to create a fruiting mini-forest that produced pounds of shiitake mushrooms, on demand! We’ll talk about logging roads, how they fruit and what they can become. We’ll do a few wild forays, learning these woods and identification of best practices. While we’re hitting the mushroom trail, we’ll also visit the fruiting, blooming, rooting wild foods with Russ Cohen, naturalist educator.
3 day program - limited spaces, $250 scholarships available. Please email [email protected] to RSVP/pre pay

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OCTOBER

October 13th, 2018
Greenhorns presents:
Wild fruit vinega! Making Apple cider vinegar on a homestead scale.
Half day session at the Pembroke Reversing Hall - (Odd Fellows Hall 4 Leighton Point Road, Pembroke ME 04666)

Workshop will include:

- Making apple cider vinegar for your own use. We’ll be Gathering wild + heirloom Apples.
- Tasting varieties and learning how the different flavor profiles impact flavor outcome in cider, generating a ‘data sheet’ on the prolific trees in the area.
- Pressing- best sanitation practices, relevant rules.
- Fermenting- materials provided, space provided, you will end up with your own carboy of vinegar. We will go through value added, fire cider, vinaigrette, herbal vinegar etc.
- Other considerations, labels, sales rules, MOFGA etc.

Course costs sliding scale $50- $100 (includes the glass carboy), scholarships available. For information or to sign up email [email protected]

Thats all thats confirmed - in all likelihood we’ll add a few more details, and some events to the schedule and will keep you all updated as we do! 

If you are unable to attend any of our events this year but still wish to donate to help support the Greenhorns please click HERE to donate online or alternatively you can make a check out to our new fiscal sponsor MOFGA (Maine Farmers and Gardeners Association) with Greenhorns in the memo line.

This can be mailed to:

MOFGA
PO 170
Unity Maine 04988

The Farm School is offering 4 exciting new fellowship positions in 2018!

Program for Visiting Schools Fellowship for Farm-Based Education Leaders:

Two of the new Fellowships available from The Farm School invest in training and mentoring the next generation of farm-based education leaders. The focus of the fellowship is on developing practical agricultural skills, production experience and exposure to The Farm School's nationally recognized Program for Visiting Schools.
The Farm School will award up to two full scholarships (including tuition, room and board, books and materials) to our year-long practical training in sustainable farming to compelling applicants who communicate a clear vision for connecting young people to the land through farming. They should also demonstrate that they possess leadership potential to either start a farm-based education organization in the future, or to manage and shape an existing program at another institution.

Doune Trust Fellowship for Community Agricultural Leaders:

One full scholarship is available for a uniquely bright and compelling student representing an underserved community. The recipient of this fellowship should have great potential to serve or lead that community agriculturally. This scholarship carries the full value of the student farmer tuition contribution, including room, board, books and materials.

Willow Tree Fellowship for African American/Black, Hispanic/Latinx and Indigenous Farmers:

One full scholarship is available for a student who identifies as African American/Black, Hispanic/Latinx or Indigenous and who demonstrates particular promise to make good use of the Learn to Farm Program's agricultural training. This scholarship carries the full value of the student farmer tuition contribution, including room, board, books and materials.

The closing date for these fellowships is FEBRUARY 15th SO DON'T DELAY!
Click HERE for more information on eligibility and how to apply.


The Quivira Coalition, a Santa Fe­ based nonprofit that builds resilience by fostering ecological, economic and social health on Western working lands, is seeking an Education and Outreach Coordinator. The chosen candidate should understand the connections between land health, working watersheds, and good food. In addition, they should also have a genuine passion for helping others develop the knowledge and skills to contribute to vital food and agriculture systems and healthy watersheds and soil.
The coordinator should be a people­ oriented organizer who has worked with agricultural producers and/or in experiential education. They should possess strong communications, logistics, and event management skills. An ideal candidate would enjoy working with ranchers, land managers, farmers, and the public and is dedicated to about solving
current food production, agriculture, and land health challenges. This person should also live in or near Santa Fe, New Mexico (or be willing to relocate), have the flexibility to travel to farms and ranches, and have experience in large and small event management.
The coordinator will work closely with Quivira staff to support successful educational programming. This includes land health workshops, a variety of agrarian trainings and the annual Quivira Conference (conference coordination comprises approximately 50% of this position). Additionally, this person will work closely with director to build capacity in the Education and Outreach program and expand its scope. Specific duties and responsibilities include: (more…)

credit: CasarsaGuru / iStock


There is a growing recognition in both the faith and farming communities, of the opportunities for both to work together. Greenhorns recognized this and partnered with members from a diverse range of faith communities to hold our Faith Lands conference in California this coming March. We have connected with farmers and faith leaders from all over the country. Together we will discover what works and what does not with these two communities come together. Our partner in this work Rev. Nurya Parish of Plainsong Farm & Ministry  drew our attention to a recent article written by Kendall Vanderslice for Christianity Today about this idea of Farminaries that is spreading across the country.
Farminary

"Throughout his time in seminary, Stucky had dreamed of teaching theology on a farm—or a “farminary,” his colleagues joked. Intrigued by this vision, Barnes began to explore rumors that the seminary owned a nearby piece of empty property. The seminary purchased the plot in 2010 from a friend of the school, hoping that one day the property could somehow contribute to the mission. For four years, it remained nothing more than an asset on a spreadsheet. As Barnes later discovered, the 21-acre field was already zoned for agriculture, and Princeton’s Farminary Program was born."

Click HERE to read the full article.

credit: Grass Roots Farmers’ Cooperative


Howdy! Cody Hopkins, here. I’m thrilled to be guest blogging for the Greenhorns on behalf of Grass Roots Farmers’ Cooperative. We’re a group of pasture-based livestock farmers operating under a single set of animal husbandry standards and selling our meats under the same brand. Of the many exciting endeavors our cooperative has set out to accomplish, the one I want to focus on here is our efforts to breakdown the daunting barriers to entry for beginning farmers.
My wife Andrea and I are fortunate to have been farming for 11 years now. When we first founded Falling Sky Farm, we had a lot of support from friends and family. But not everyone is so lucky. And even though we had relatively easy access to leased land (a barrier that’s insurmountable to a lot of folks looking to get started in agriculture). Dealing with the lack of access to processing and cold storage services, combined with managing the complexity of operating a fast-growing small business, was extremely overwhelming.
(more…)


Downeast Foxfire Camp is a ten-day rowing and sailing expedition in eastern Maine that is being hosted by the Greenhorns and taught by the wonderful and talented Arista Holden. The expedition will take place from August 17th - 26th 2018. 
In addition to travelling in a Bantry Bay gig to rugged, spruce-covered islands and peninsulas, we will be celebrating the folk traditions of the Maine coast and practicing our best "Leave No Trace" camp craft techniques. Together we will learn traditional crafts, sustainable forestry techniques and island farming. Expect to be challenged, inspired and to make life-long friends as we ebb and flow along with the 12 foot tides in an environment of support, safety and encouragement. 
The course boh starts and Ends in Machiasport, Maine - 44 ̊37’15” N  67 ̊23’03” W 

The cost of this expedition is $450 which includes:

- Three meals a day with snacks
Training in:
- Traditional seamanship: rowing, sailing, navigation, knots, tide and weather
- Spoon carving and birch bark containers
- Sustainable firewood lot management
- Salt water farming
- Leave No Trace camp craft techniques
- Foxfire oral story collection
- Lots of smiles, support and spontaneous fun.

*Not Included:
Getting to/from Machiasport. (However we will help you connect with other participants to carpool)
The nearest International airport and bus station with connections to major US cities is in Bangor.
Group size: 15-25 people​
Have ​questions? Please contact:
Arista Holden
Trainer and Program Director of Downeast Foxfire Camp.
[email protected]

Click HERE to find out more about the Downeast Foxfire Camp!